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Research Papers

Slipping Dynamics of Slender-Beam Payloads During Lay-Down Operations

[+] Author and Article Information
Shenghai Wang

Department of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: shenghai_wang@outlook.com

Aldo Ferri

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Tech,
Atlanta, GA 30332-0405
e-mail: al.ferri@me.gatech.edu

William Singhose

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Tech,
Atlanta, GA 30332-0405
e-mail: singhose@gatech.edu

1Present address: School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT,AND CONTROL. Manuscript received January 5, 2017; final manuscript received December 14, 2017; published online March 7, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Davide Spinello.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 140(8), 081001 (Mar 07, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: DS-17-1009; doi: 10.1115/1.4039154 History: Received January 05, 2017; Revised December 14, 2017

When laying down a long slender beam from a near-vertical orientation, to a horizontal position on a flat surface, the payload may slip and move suddenly in unintended and unpredictable ways. This occurs during crane operations when the movements of the overhead trolley and lowering of the hoist cable are not properly coordinated. The payload's unintended sliding can potentially cause damage and injure people. This paper presents static and dynamic analyses of slender-beam payload lay-down operations that establish a structured method to predict the safe conditions for lay-down operations. Also, a new method to measure the friction coefficient of surface-to-line contact is proposed. Lay-down experiments are carried out to verify the theoretical predictions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Slender-beam payload lay-down operation

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of slender-beam payload lay-down model

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Fig. 3

Free body diagram of slender-beam payload lay-down model

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Fig. 4

Subregions of ϕθ space; only regions where N and T are both > 0 are physically admissible (① and ②)

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Fig. 5

μmin with respect to θ and ϕ (μmin ≤ 4, three-dimensional diagram); uniform beam payload

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Fig. 6

Static slip boundaries for different μs; uniform beam payload

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Fig. 10

No-slip region for the case ℓ1= 2, ℓ1′= 3/7, and μs = 0.5. Nonuniform case, ε = 0.1, 0.2, 0.5. Shaded region is where N > 0, T > 0, and |fs|<μsN. Dashed line is boundary N = 0 for the static case, lower line is the line ϕ = θ, upper line is the line ϕ = θ + π/2.

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Fig. 11

Critical hoist speed (dimensional) dependence on θ and ϕ; L2 = 0.2492 m, ℓG = 1/2, q = 0.577

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Fig. 12

Boundaries for μs = 0.5 (L˙1 = 0.14 m/s, L2 = 0.2492 m, ℓG = 1/2, q = 0.577)

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Fig. 8

No-slip region for the case ℓ1= 2, ℓ1′= 3/7; uniform payload case with q = 0.577 and ℓG = 1/2. Shaded region is where N > 0, T > 0, and |fs|<μsN. Dashed line is boundary N = 0 for the static case, lower line is the line ϕ = θ, upper line is the line ϕ = θ + π/2.

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Fig. 7

No-slip region for the case ℓ1= 2, ℓ1′= 1/7; uniform payload case with q = 0.577 and ℓG = 1/2. Shaded region is where N > 0, T > 0, and |fs|<μsN. Dashed line is boundary N = 0 for the static case, lower line is the line ϕ = θ, upper line is the line ϕ = θ + π/2.

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Fig. 13

Experiment setup (full view)

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Fig. 14

Experiment setup (zoom in view)

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Fig. 9

No-slip region for the case ℓ1= 2 and μs = 0.5; uniform payload case q = 0.577 and ℓG = 1/2. (a) ℓ1′ = 0.30, (b) ℓ1′= 0.67, and (c) ℓ1′= 0.95. Shaded region is where N > 0, T > 0, and |fs|<μsN. Dashed line is boundary N = 0 for the static case, lower line is the line ϕ = θ, upper line is the line ϕ = θ + π/2.

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Fig. 17

Actual versus predicted position of point T1

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Fig. 18

Measurement setup of average friction coefficient

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Fig. 19

Measured values of μs as a function of the angle θ at which slip occurred

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Fig. 20

Experiment result with hook (L˙1 = 0.14 m/s)

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Fig. 15

Measurement setup of friction coefficient

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Fig. 16

Method to calculate the position of pivot point A from marker readings

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Fig. 21

Experiment result with L˙1 = 0.02 m/s, comparison with theoretical prediction with various cable hoist speeds. Solid black line is boundary N = 0 for the static case.

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Fig. 22

Experiment result with L˙1 = 0.14 m/s, comparison with theoretical prediction with various cable hoist speeds. Solid black line is boundary N = 0 for the static case.

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