0
Research Papers

The Effect of Squeeze-Film Damping on the Shock Response of Clamped-Clamped Microbeams

[+] Author and Article Information
Hadi Yagubizade

Transducers Science and Technology, MESA + Institute for Nanotechnology,  University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede, The Netherlands

Mohammad I. Younis

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902myounis@binghamton.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 134(1), 011017 (Dec 05, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004789 History: Received February 26, 2010; Revised June 08, 2011; Published December 05, 2011; Online December 05, 2011

This paper presents an investigation into the nonlinear effect of squeeze-film damping on the response of a clamped–clamped microbeam to mechanical shock. In this work, we solve simultaneously the nonlinear Reynolds equation, to model squeeze-film damping, coupled with a nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli beam equation. A Galerkin-based reduced-order model and a finite-difference method are utilized for the solid domain and fluid domain, respectively. Several results demonstrating the effect of gas pressure on the response of the microbeams are shown. Comparison with the results of a fully coupled multiphysics nonlinear finite-element model is presented. The results indicate that, for devices operating in air, squeeze-film damping can be used effectively to minimize the displacements of released microstructures during shock and impact. The results also indicate that squeeze-film damping has more significant effect on the response of microstructures in the dynamic shock regime compared to the quasi-static shock regime. A computationally efficient approach is proposed to model the fluidic-structural problem more efficiently based on a nonlinear analytical expression of the squeeze-film damping.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of a clamped–clamped microbeam suspended over a substrate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The FE model in comsol showing a quarter of the modeled beam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison of the response of the microbeam generated using linear and nonlinear FE models (o), and ROM (--) in vacuum conditions; (a) T = 1.0 ms and (b) T = 0.1 ms

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

The maximum center point deflection of the microbeam under a 10,000g shock load at different ambient pressures using FE model (o) and ROM (--)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Comparison of the response of a microbeam versus shock amplitude at different pressure values, including vacuum, for (a) T = 1.0 ms and (b) T = 0.1 ms

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The maximum center point deflection of a microbeam versus shock amplitude for various values of gap widths for Pa=104 Pa

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The maximum center point deflection of a microbeam versus gap width when subjected to a shock force of amplitude 10,000g for Pa=104 Pa and near vacuum conditions; (a) T = 1.0 ms, (b) T = 0.1 ms, and (c) Pa=104 Pa

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Time history response of the microbeam under 1000g shock of T = 1.0 ms at different pressure values using (a) the coupled model and (b) the nonlinear analytical damping model, Eq. 10

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

The maximum center point deflection of a microbeam versus gap width when subjected to a shock force of amplitude 10,000g for Pa=103 Pa and near vacuum conditions; (a) T = 1.0 ms, (b) T = 0.1 ms, and (c) Pa=103 Pa

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In