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Research Papers

A Nonlinear Clutch Pressure Observer for Automatic Transmission: Considering Drive-Shaft Compliance

[+] Author and Article Information
Bingzhao Gao

 State Key Laboratory of Automobile Dynamic Simulation, Jilin University, 130025 P. R. China;  Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yokohama National University, 240-8501 Japan

Hong Chen1

 Professor Department of Control Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Renmin Street 5988, 130025 Changchun, PR China; State Key Laboratory of Automobile Dynamic Simulation, Jilin University, 130025 P. R. Chinachenh@jlu.edu.cn

Lu Tian

 Department of Control Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 130025 P. R. China

Kazushi Sanada

 Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yokohama National University, 240-8501 Japan

1

Corresponding author.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 134(1), 011018 (Dec 05, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004778 History: Received May 07, 2010; Revised May 04, 2011; Published December 05, 2011; Online December 05, 2011

For a new kind of automatic transmissions adopting clutch-to-clutch shift control technology, a clutch pressure observer is proposed to improve the estimation accuracy during the shift torque phase. The observer is designed in the concept of input-to-state stability. Lookup tables, which are widely used to represent the complex nonlinear characteristics of engine systems, appear in their original form in the designed reduced-order observer, and the torsional stiffness of the drive axle shaft is considered in the model-based design procedure to improve the estimation accuracy. Finally, the designed pressure observer is tested on an amesim powertrain simulation model. Comparisons with an observer without considering the drive shaft compliance are given as well.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic graph of automatic transmission

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Figure 2

Speed sensor output

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Figure 3

Drift out of estimated torque using integration of speed signals

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Figure 4

Simulation results of nominal condition (torque characteristics of engine and torque converter: nominal, m = 1500 kg, and θg  = 0 deg). Left: Continuous implementation; Right: Discrete implementation.

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Figure 5

Simulation results of different driving condition (torque characteristics of engine and torque converter are enlarged by 15%, m = 1725 kg, θg  = 5 deg, Ks  = 242 Nm/deg, and It  = 0.09 kg m2 ). Left: Continuous implementation; Right: Discrete implementation.

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Figure 6

Simulation results of different driving condition (torque characteristics of engine and torque converter are reduced by 15%, m = 1250 kg, θg  = 0 deg, Ks  = 198 Nm/deg, and It  = 0.03 kg m2 ). Left: Continuous implementation; Right: Discrete implementation.

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