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RESEARCH PAPERS

Analysis, Design, and Optimization of High Speed Vehicle Suspensions Using State Variable Techniques

[+] Author and Article Information
J. K. Hedrick

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.

G. F. Billington

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.; U. S. Air Force

D. A. Dreesbach

Dept. of Engineering Mechanics, Materials, and Measurements, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.; U. S. Air Force

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 96(2), 193-203 (Jun 01, 1974) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3426791 History: Received January 03, 1974; Online July 13, 2010

Abstract

This article applies state variable techniques to high speed vehicle suspension design. When a reasonably complex suspension model is treated, the greater adaptability of state variable techniques to digital computer application makes it more attractive than the commonly used integral transform method. A vehicle suspension model is developed, state variable techniques are applied, numerical methods are presented, and, finally, an optimization algorithm is chosen to select suspension parameters. A fairly complete bibliography is included in each of these areas. The state variable technique is illustrated in the solution of two suspension optimization problems. First, the vertical plane suspension of a high speed vehicle subject to guideway and aerodynamic inputs will be analyzed. The vehicle model, including primary and secondary suspension systems, and subject to both heave and pitch motions, has thirteen state variables. Second, the horizontal plane suspension of a high speed vehicle subject to guideway and lateral aerodynamic inputs is analyzed. This model also has thirteen state variables. The suspension parameters of both these models are optimized. Numerical results are presented for a representative vehicle, showing time response, mean square values, optimized suspension parameters, system eigenvalues, and acceleration spectral densities.

Copyright © 1974 by ASME
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