0
RESEARCH PAPERS: Transportation Papers

Optimization of Rail Vehicle Operating Speed With Practical Constraints

[+] Author and Article Information
J. J. Cox

Department of Civil Engineering, Engineering Mechanics and Materials, USAF Academy, Colo.

J. K. Hedrick

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.

N. K. Cooperrider

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz. 85281

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 100(4), 260-269 (Dec 01, 1978) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3426377 History: Received August 01, 1978; Online July 13, 2010

Abstract

A constrained optimization algorithm to maximize the operating speed of a fifteen degree-of-freedom lateral dynamic model for a passenger railcar subject to random alignment irregularities is presented in this paper. The constraints placed on the optimization problem limit the passenger discomfort, primary and secondary suspension clearance, the wheel slippage, and secondary suspension stroke to practical values while traversing a curve. The optimization results demonstrate that the primary suspension system and the wheel conicity have the most profound influence on maximizing the critical speed where “hunting” begins. The maximum critical speed is insensitive to large variations in secondary yaw stiffness. The secondary lateral stiffness has less effect on the maximum critical speed than the primary lateral stiffness. Thus, the secondary stiffness can be chosen primarily to satisfy passenger ride comfort specifications. The maximum critical speed is quite sensitive to whether the wheel is new, slightly worn, or severely worn.

Copyright © 1978 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In