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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A General Framework for Rigid Body Dynamics, Stability, and Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Hooshang Hemami

Department of Electrical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210e-mail: hemami@ee.eng.ohio-state.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 124(2), 241-251 (May 10, 2002) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1468227 History: Received September 16, 1999; Online May 10, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Passive and active components for a single degree of translation motion of a point mass. The variable K and L, respectively, refer to a linear elastic and viscous elements.
Grahic Jump Location
The Lyapunov function v, its rate v̇, the function ε and its rate ε̇ as functions of time in simulation 1
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The nine translational state trajectories plotted versus time in simulation 1
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The nine rotational state trajectories plotted versus time in simulation 1
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The vertical hopping of the one rigid body from simulation 2. The vertical height of the center of gravity, its velocity, and the corresponding augmented state are plotted as functions of time in simulation 2.
Grahic Jump Location
The Lyapunov function and its derivative as functions of time for a two-link rigid body system. The Lapunov function is the sum of the translational and rotational energies of the two bodies in simulation 3.
Grahic Jump Location
The nine state trajectories as functions of time for the rotational motion of body 1 in simulation 3
Grahic Jump Location
The nine state trajectories as functions of time for the translational motion of body 1 in simulation 3
Grahic Jump Location
The nine state trajectories as functions of time for the rotational motion of body 2 in simulation 3
Grahic Jump Location
The nine state trajectories as functions of time for the translational motion of body 2 in simulation 3

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