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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Hybrid Neural Network Approach for the Development of Friction Component Dynamic Model

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Cao, K. W. Wang

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering,The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

Y. Fujii, W. E. Tobler

Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 126(1), 144-153 (Apr 12, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1649980 History: Received May 14, 2002; Revised August 25, 2003; Online April 12, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Baseline Network Architecture z−1=One step time delay
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Measured Band Brake Torque with Different Oil Temperature, Apply Pressure and Slip Profiles
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Hybrid Network Architecture
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Friction Component Engagement Test Stand
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Training Results of Baseline Neural Network Model Initial Slip: 157.1 rad/sec (1500 rpm), Final Apply Pressure: 6.206e+4 N/m2 (9 psi), Initial Oil Temperature: 394.1 K (250°F), Oil Flow Rate: 2.273e−5 m3/sec (0.3 gallon/min)
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Training Results of Baseline Neural Network Model Initial Slip: 157.1 rad/s (1500 rpm), Final Apply Pressure: 6.206e+4 N/m2 (9 psi), Initial Oil Temperature: 271.9 K (30°F), Oil Flow Rate: 2.273e−5 m3/s (0.3 gallon/min)
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Training Results of Baseline Neural Network Model Initial Slip: 314.2 rad/s (3000 rpm), Final Apply Pressure: 1.034e+5 N/m2 (15 psi), Initial Oil Temperature: 271.9 K (30°F), Oil Flow Rate: 2.273e−5 m3/s (0.3 gallon/min)
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Testing Results of Baseline Neural Network Model –Measured Torque (N.m) [[dashed_line]]Network Estimated Torque (N.m) Initial Slip: 314.2 rad/s (3000 rpm), Final Apply Pressure: 1.034e+5 N/m2 (15 psi), Initial Oil Temperature: 310.8 K (100°F), Oil Flow Rate: 4.546e−5 m3/s (0.6 gallon/min)
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Training Results of Hybrid Neural Network Model: –Measured Torque (N.m) [[dashed_line]]Network Estimated (N.m)
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Training Results of Hybrid Neural Network Model: –Measured Torque (N.m) [[dashed_line]]Network Estimated Torque (N.m)
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Training Results of Hybrid Neural Network Model: –Measured Torque (N.m) [[dashed_line]]Network Estimated Torque (N.m)
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Testing Results of Hybrid Neural Network Model: –Measured Torque [[dashed_line]]Network Estimated Torque [[dotted_line]] Torque Estimated by the First Principle Model
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CPU Time Comparison: Hybrid ANN versus First Principle Model
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Cylindrical Co-ordinates for Reynolds Equation: Plate-type Friction Component
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X-Y-Z Co-ordinates for Reynolds Equation: Band-type Friction Component

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