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TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Dynamics of Lead-Screw Drives: Low-Order Modeling and Experiments

[+] Author and Article Information
Kripa K. Varanasi, Samir A. Nayfeh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 126(2), 388-396 (Aug 05, 2004) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1771690 History: Received January 03, 2003; Revised September 22, 2003; Online August 05, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Sketch of a ball-screw drive
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Quasi-static displacement
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Photograph of the small ball-screw stage showing the machine base, carriage, and motor
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Photograph of the small ball-screw stage showing the carriage, screw, bearing block, and coupling
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Schematic of sine-sweep experiments. The signals x(t),y(t), and ud(t) are the power amplifier input, DAC output, and swept sine disturbance, respectively. The required transfer function is Y(s)/X(s)
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Measured and predicted transfer function from motor torque to linear encoder for the stage of Fig. 3: measured (solid line), predicted (dashed line), and predicted if the non-minimum-phase zero is neglected (dotted line)
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Photograph of the large ball-screw stage
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Drawing of the large ball-screw stage showing measurement positions for modal experiment
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Measured (solid line) and predicted (dashed line) collocated transfer functions of the large stage without viscoelastic damper
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Measured (solid line) and predicted (dashed line) non-collocated transfer functions of the large stage without viscoelastic damper
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Measured (solid line) and predicted (dashed line) collocated transfer function of the large stage with a viscoelastic damper installed
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Measured (solid line) and predicted (dashed line) non-collocated transfer function of the large stage with a viscoelastic damper installed
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Measured axial mode shape of the large ball-screw test stand at 349 Hz with loss factor of 0.04. The figure shows snapshots of the mode starting from undeformed position. The small squares indicate measurement locations.

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