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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamic Compensation of Spindle Integrated Force Sensors With Kalman Filter

[+] Author and Article Information
Simon S. Park, Yusuf Altintas

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2324 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4, Canada Phone: 604-822-2182, Fax: 604-822-2403

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 126(3), 443-452 (Dec 03, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1789531 History: Received October 23, 2003; Online December 03, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Assembly of the force sensors in the spindle-Fa is the cutting force at the tool tip and the Fm is the measured force from the force sensors (a) Schematics, (b) Top view
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Transfer Function Φxx(ω)=Fxm(ω)/Fxa(ω), (b) Transfer Function Φyy(ω)=Fym(ω)/Fya(ω), and (c) Transfer Function Φzz(ω)=Fzm(ω)/Fza(ω)
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FRF of the measured, Kalman Filter, and compensated spindle integrated force sensing system; (a) x direction, (b) y direction, (c) z direction
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Five fluted cutting force measurements at 1000 rpm with (a) x, (b) y, and (c) z directions. The figures are shown in the time and frequency (normalized with the spindle freq.) domains. The spindle frequency at 1000 rpm corresponds to 16.7 Hz. (‘Ref.’ denotes the reference cutting forces from the dynamometer at 1000 rpm, ‘Fm’ denotes the measured force from the spindle integrated force sensor system, and ‘KF’ denotes the Kalman filter compensated cutting forces).
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Five fluted cutting force measurements at 6000 rpm with (a) x, (b) y, and (c) z directions. The figures are shown in the time and frequency (normalized with the spindle freq.) domains. The spindle frequency at 6000 rpm corresponds to 100 Hz.
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Five fluted cutting force measurements at 9000 rpm with (a) x, (b) y, and (c) z directions. The figures are shown in the time and frequency (normalized with the spindle freq.) domains. The spindle frequency at 9000 rpm corresponds to 150 Hz.
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Five fluted cutting force measurements at 12000 rpm with (a) x, (b) y, and (c) z directions. The figures are shown in the time and frequency (normalized with the spindle freq.) domains. The spindle frequency at 12000 rpm corresponds to 200 Hz.

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