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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Energy Regenerative Actuator for Motion Control With Application to Fluid Power Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Donald Margolis

Professor,  Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 127(1), 33-40 (Apr 18, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1870038 History: Received January 06, 2003; Revised April 18, 2004

Motion control is principally involved with moving a load along some prescribed trajectory. Flight simulators and numerically controlled machine tools are examples where motion control is required. Actuators for motion control are typically electrohydraulic, electropneumatic, or electromechanical. An electric signal from a controller modulates high-power elements that control motion of a load in some prescribed manner. Since loads are continuously being accelerated and decelerated, actuators absorb energy as frequently as they output energy, but power is required from the supply regardless of the direction of power flow in the actuator. The absorbed power is simply dissipated in the actuator or power supply. An actuator concept is developed here in which energy storage elements become part of the actuator, and absorbed power is recovered while still performing a high level of motion control. The concept is developed for a fluid power application, but is not restricted to fluid-type devices. Practical realizations of this concept will allow downsizing of power supplies as well as reduced power consumption for any particular application.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Schematic and bond graph of energy storage position control actuator

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Figure 4

Step response of the energy storage actuator system

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Figure 5

Energy in the accumulator for the step response of the energy storage actuator

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Figure 1

Spring-mass system and associated control system

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Figure 2

Active motion control system using a voice coil actuator

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Figure 15

Bond graph for the energy storage, force control actuator

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Figure 16

Response of the controlled accumulator for the force control actuator

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Figure 17

Acceleration response of the force control actuator. As the pressure in the controlled accumulator approaches the desired pressure, the acceleration response approaches the desired acceleration.

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Figure 18

Energy required over two operating cycles of the force control actuator

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Figure 6

Valve switching needed to accomplish the step response of Fig. 4

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Figure 7

Step response of the conventional hydraulic servo system

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Figure 8

Valve motion for the conventional system for a step response

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Figure 9

Energy dissipated for a step response of the conventional system

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Figure 10

Response of the conventional system for two cycles of harmonic input at 1Hz.

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Figure 11

Energy dissipated by the conventional system for two cycles of harmonic input at 1Hz.

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Figure 12

Response of the energy storage actuator system for two cycles of input at 1Hz.

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Figure 13

Energy from the accumulator of the energy storage actuator for two cycles of input at 1Hz.

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Figure 14

Modified energy storage actuator for force control

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