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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamic Modeling of Residual-Affected Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines with Variable Valve Actuation

[+] Author and Article Information
Gregory M. Shaver

Design Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021greg.shaver@gmail.com

J. Christian Gerdes

Design Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021gerdes@stanford.edu

Matthew J. Roelle

Design Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021roelle@stanford.edu

Patrick A. Caton

Thermosciences Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021caton@stanford.edu

Christopher F. Edwards

Thermosciences Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021cfe@stanford.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 127(3), 374-381 (Jul 19, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1979511 History: Received October 15, 2003; Revised July 19, 2004

One practical method for achieving homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) in internal combustion engines is to modulate the valves to trap or reinduct exhaust gases, increasing the energy of the charge, and enabling autoignition. Controlling combustion phasing with valve modulation can be challenging, however, since any controller must operate through the chemical kinetics of HCCI and account for the cycle-to-cycle dynamics arising from the retained exhaust gas. This paper presents a simple model of the overall HCCI process that captures these fundamental aspects. The model uses an integrated Arrhenius rate expression to capture the importance of species concentrations and temperature on the ignition process and predict the start of combustion. The cycle-to-cycle dynamics, in turn, develop through mass exchange between a control volume representing the cylinder and a control mass modeling the exhaust manifold. Despite its simplicity, the model predicts combustion phasing, pressure evolution and work output for propane combustion experiments at levels of fidelity comparable to more complex representations. Transient responses to valve timing changes are also captured and, with minor modification, the model can, in principle, be extended to handle a variety of fuels.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Schematic of exhaust manifold control mass: (a) residual mass from previous exhaust cycle, θ=EVO; (b) increase in mass due to cylinder exhaust, EVO<θ<720; (c) maximum amount of exhaust manifold mass, θ=720; (d) decrease in mass due to reinduction, 0<θ<EVC; (e) post-reinduction mass, θ=EVC; (f) decrease in mass to residual value EVC<θ<EVO

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Figure 3

Temperature threshold approach: Simulated HCCI combustion during steady state: dashed—simulation, solid—experiment; left—IVO∕EVC=25∕165, middle—IVO∕EVC=45∕185, right—IVO∕EVC=65∕205

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Figure 4

Integrated Arrhenius rate threshold approach: Simulated HCCI combustion during steady state: dashed—simulation, solid—experiment; left—IVO∕EVC=25∕165, middle—IVO∕EVC=45∕185, right—IVO∕EVC=65∕205

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Figure 5

Knock integral threshold approach: Simulated HCCl combustion during steady state: dashed—simulation, solid—experiment; left—IVO∕EVC=25∕165, middle—IVO∕EVC=45∕185, right—IVO∕EVC=65∕205

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Figure 6

Simulated HCCl combustion over a valve timing change: top—experiment, bottom—simulation

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Figure 1

Valve mass flows: left—induction flows with intake and exhaust valves open, center—exhaust flow, right—valve timings

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