0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Thermodynamic Model of Membrane Humidifiers for PEM Fuel Cell Humidification Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Dongmei Chen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Huei Peng1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109hpeng@umich.edu

Nafion is a trademark of DuPont Company

1

Corresponding author, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2133, 734-936-0352.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 127(3), 424-432 (Oct 22, 2004) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1978910 History: Received February 23, 2004; Revised October 22, 2004

Maintaining proper membrane humidity is crucial to ensure optimal operation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system. A membrane humidifier using the fuel cell exhaust gas to humidify the dry air is studied in this paper. We first develop a thermodynamic model, which captures the crucial dynamic variables of the humidifier, including the pressure, flow rate, temperature, and relative humidity of the air flow. Steady-state simulations are then conducted to optimize the humidifier design. Subsequently, dynamic simulations are performed to predict the behavior of the humidifier during transient operations typical for automotive applications. A simple proportional controller was designed to control the humidifier operation.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) Membrane humidifier integrated with fuel cell stack. (b) Humidifier structure.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Humidifier channel plate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Three channels of a humidifier unit: Exhaust gas channel (right), humidification channel (center, open), and heat exchanging channel (left, closed). (b) Three channels of a humidifier unit: Exhaust gas channel (right), humidification channel (center, closed), and heat exchanging channel (left, open).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Control volumes of one humidifier unit

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Humidifier model in SIMULINK

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Heat transfer sub-model in SIMULINK

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Required vapor rate added to the P2000 cathode inlet at 80°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Counter flow vs parallel flow arrangements. Solid line: Counter flow; Dashed line: Parallel flow.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparison of three different cross-section designs with constant 381 units with varying channel height “H”. Solid line: 1mm×1mm; Dashed line: 1mm×2mm; Dash-dot line: 1mm×4mm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Comparison of two different cross-section designs with constant 381 units with varying channel width “W”. Solid line: 1mm×1mm; Dashed line: 0.5mm×1mm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Comparison of four different unit numbers with 1mm×1mm channel cross section. Solid line: 95 units; Dashed line: 190 units; Dash-dot line: 381 units; Dotted line: 571 units.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Dynamic response of the membrane vapor transfer rate under step inputs

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Humidifier control block diagram

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Membrane vapor transfer rate under two conditions: No control vs P control

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In