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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Hamilton’s Equations for Impact Simulations With Perforation and Fragmentation

[+] Author and Article Information
Blaise A. Horban

Department of Mechanical Engineering, 1 University Station C2200,  University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

Eric P. Fahrenthold1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, 1 University Station C2200,  University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712epfahren@mail.utexas.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 127(4), 617-622 (Nov 22, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2098879 History: Received October 03, 2001; Revised November 22, 2004

Conventional models of high velocity impact dynamics rely on approximate solutions of the governing partial differential equations for an elastic-plastic continuum, developed using weighted residual, finite difference, or other techniques prevalent in the computational mechanics literature. Hamiltonian mechanics provides an alternative approach, one which makes no reference to any PDE description of the physical system. The derived Hamilton’s equations incorporate general contact-impact effects, apply to a wide class of material constitutive relations, and allow for the simulation of highly nonlinear three-dimensional impact problems.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Wall shock problem, velocity vs position at t=0.1

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Figure 2

Wall shock problem, density vs position at t=0.1

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Figure 3

Wall shock problem, pressure vs position at t=0.1

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Figure 4

Wall shock problem, temperature vs position at t=0.1

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Figure 5

Long rod impact problem, element plot of the initial configuration

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Figure 6

Long rod impact problem, particle-element plot at 100microseconds after impact

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