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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Handwheel Force Feedback for Lanekeeping Assistance: Combined Dynamics and Stability

[+] Author and Article Information
Joshua P. Switkes, Eric J. Rossetter, Ian A. Coe

Design Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021

J. Christian Gerdes

Design Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4021switkesj@stanford.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 128(3), 532-542 (Nov 21, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2229256 History: Received January 11, 2005; Revised November 21, 2005

Lanekeeping assistance could save thousands of lives each year by maintaining lane position in the absence of driver steering commands. In order to work smoothly with the driver, handwheel force feedback must be an integral part of such a system. Here we combine force feedback with a lanekeeping controller based on lateral and heading error. In addition to force feedback replicating the feel in a conventional vehicle, the force can be based on the level of lanekeeping assistance being given. This coupling of the force feedback and assistance systems can destabilize the vehicle if not designed properly. Linear modeling verified by experiments shows the effect of varying the gains on both the force feedback and the lanekeeping assistance itself. In this analysis we show that within a range of values that feel reasonable to the driver, changes to the lanekeeping controller or force feedback can have marked effects on the response of the vehicle. It also shows that stability of the system can be ensured by injecting artificial damping or reproducing the on-center characteristics of a conventional vehicle. The analysis allows the force feedback designer to determine a range of stable force feedback gains, from which a set most acceptable to the driver can be chosen.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Yaw plane vehicle model

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Figure 2

Spring analogy for lanekeeping controller

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Figure 3

Potential field lanekeeping controller

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Figure 4

Steering geometry causing aligning moment and jacking effect

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Figure 5

Interconnection of force feedback and SBW vehicle systems

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Figure 6

System pole locations with increasing potential field force

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Figure 7

System pole locations with increasing damping

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Figure 8

System pole locations with increasing aligning moment

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Figure 9

System pole locations with increasing jacking effect

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Figure 10

System pole locations with increasing lookahead distance

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Figure 11

System pole locations with increasing speed

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Figure 12

Force feedback mechanical system

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Figure 13

Experiment and simulation with unstable force feedback gains

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Figure 14

Experiment and simulation with stable force feedback gains

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Figure 15

Experiment and simulation with aligning moment force feedback gains

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Differential braking-based system pole locations with increasing aligning moment force feedback

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Figure 17

Time response of system with two different steering geometries

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