0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Electromechanical Modeling of Piezoceramic Actuators for Dynamic Loading Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Helen M. Georgiou

 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, M5S 3G8, Canadasaoulli@mie.utoronto.ca

Ridha Ben Mrad

 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, M5S 3G8, Canadarbenmrad@mie.utoronto.ca

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 128(3), 558-567 (Oct 11, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2234486 History: Received March 19, 2004; Revised October 11, 2005

In most piezoelectric applications, including precision motion control, pressure regulation in micropumps, and force control in microactuators, there is a need to develop a model that accounts for hysteresis and describes both the electrical and mechanical properties of piezoceramics, along with the electromechanical coupling between the two domains. A model that characterizes hysteresis and the coupled electromechanical effect of the sensing and actuating signals is presented. The model presented characterizes the electromechanical properties of a piezoceramic actuator when subject to variable mechanical load disturbance conditions. The model is tested under a range of voltage excitations at frequencies up to 111Hz and is shown to offer high accuracy.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Linear relationship between charge and displacement exhibited by a piezoelectric ceramic stack actuator; with no mechanical load or disturbance applied to the stack

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Nonlinear charge-to-voltage curve for a piezoceramic actuator. (b) Hysteretic behavior relating voltage to displacement in a piezoelectric stack actuator. [Note: (a) and (b) are plotted with no mechanical load or disturbance applied to the stack actuator]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Decrease in capacitance due to an applied mechanical load when modeling a PZT actuator as a capacitor in parallel with a resistor, where the solid and dashed lines represent the capacitance of the actuator in the no load and applied load (blocked actuator) conditions, respectively

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Generalized Maxwell slip model for the mechanical analogy, comprised of n massless-block spring elements connected in parallel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

(a) Simulated and measured charge data using the Maxwell slip model for 8cycles of a 100V peak-to-peak 12Hz sinusoidal voltage used to excite the PZT actuator, as well as error. (b) Measured and simulated voltage to charge hysteresis curve for a PZT stack. Measured, simulated, and error data are given by dashed (---), solid (—), and dotted (….) lines, respectively. No dynamic mechanical load is applied to the stack actuator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Measured and simulated voltage to charge hysteresis curve for one cycle of a 100V peak-to-peak 12Hz sinusoidal excitation voltage applied to a PZT stack. Measured and simulated data are given by dashed (---) and solid (—) lines, respectively. No dynamic mechanical load disturbance is applied to the PZT stack actuator.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) Simulated and measured charge data, as well as error, using the Maxwell slip model with a 12Hz decreasing magnitude sinusoidal voltage excitation used to excite a PZT actuator. (b) Measured and simulated voltage to charge hysteresis curve for a PZT stack. Measured, simulated, and error data are given by dashed (---), solid (—), and dotted (…) lines, respectively. No dynamic mechanical disturbance is applied to the stack actuator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Complete electromechanical model for a PZT stack actuator with voltage input V applied across the stack and resultant output displacement y experienced by the stack

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Displacement versus piezoelectric charge for a PZT stack actuator excited by a mechanical load disturbance, which is used to determine Ty

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Voltage applied across capacitive and resistive components in the model versus piezoelectric force for a PZT stack actuator excited by an applied voltage, which is used to obtain a value for TVlin

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Excitation force versus displacement for a PZT stack actuator used to acquire M

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Results for the electromechanical model with the PZT actuator excited at 12Hz and mechanical load disturbance at 21, 51, and 111Hz for (a), (b), and (c), respectively. Results for the model with the PZT actuator excited at 21, 51, and 111Hz and the mechanical load disturbance at 12Hz are shown in (d), (e), and (f). Measured, simulated, and error data are given by dashed (---), solid (—), and dotted (….) lines, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

(a) Single massless-block spring element used to build the Maxwell model. (b) Static and dynamic conditions of force and displacement for a single massless-block spring element, where the horizontal lines represent the dynamic state and the sloping lines represent the static state

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

(a) Input applied force to the n element massless-block spring system. (b) Output displacement of the n element massless-block spring system. For both figures, points a and e, and c and g represent the minimum and maximum values, respectively

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Fabricated rising curve for hysteresis behavior of elastic-plastic deformation of a material, used to characterize the Maxwell model. The asterisk is used to show the location of the initial settling point

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

(a) 100V peak-to-peak 12Hz sinusoidal voltage used to excite the PZT actuator. (b) Initial rising curve for PZT stack actuator used to characterize parameters for Maxwell model, with no dynamic mechanical load applied to the PZT stack actuator

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In