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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Analysis of a Pressure-Compensated Flow Control Valve

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Wu, G. Schoenau, D. Bitner

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9, Canada

R. Burton

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9, Canadartb093@engr.USask.Ca

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 129(2), 203-211 (Mar 03, 2004) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1870037 History: Received July 25, 2003; Revised March 03, 2004

A pressure-compensated valve (PC valve) is a type of flow control device that is a combination of a control orifice and a compensator (often called a hydrostat). The compensator orifice modulates its opening to maintain a constant pressure drop across the control orifice. In other words, the PC valve is so designed that the flow rate through the valve is governed only by the opening of the control orifice and is independent of the total pressure drop across the valve. Because of the high nonlinearities associated with this type of valve, it is impossible, in practice, to design such a valve where the flow rate is completely unaffected by the pressure drop across the valve. In this paper, the effect of the nonlinearities on the performance of the PC valve is investigated. First, a generic nonlinear model of a PC valve is developed. Using this model, all possible operating conditions can be determined. Then a linearized model is developed and used to analyze the dynamic behavior of the PC valve. The model can then be used to evaluate and improve the design and operation of the valve for specific applications.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Comparison of two types of PC valve configurations: (a) Hydrostat upstream configuration; (b) Hydrostat downstream configuration

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Figure 2

Sectional drawing of the PC valve

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Figure 3

Frequency response of flow gain of the PC valve, Gxv(s) (theoretical): (a) magnitude and (b) phase

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Figure 4

Frequency response of flow-pressure coefficient of the PC valve, GpsL(s) (theoretical): (a) magnitude and (b) phase

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Figure 5

The relationship of flow rate and pressure drop across the PC system at steady state (experimental)

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Figure 6

Comparison between the experimental results and the theoretical prediction

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Figure 7

Frequency response comparison of ∣Gxv(s)∣ for three sets of PC valve parameters

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Figure 8

Frequency response comparison of ∣GpsL(s)∣ for two sets of PC valve parameters

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Figure 9

The step response of the flow rate as a function of the pressure drop across a simple orifice and a PC valve (simulated)

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Figure 10

The step response of the flow rate as a function of the pressure drop across a PC valve (simulated)

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Figure 11

Three pressure-compensated conditions for the existing commercial PC valve

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Figure 12

Three pressure-compensated conditions for the rigid spring replacing the original spring in the commercial PC valve

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