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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamic Modeling of a Monopropellant-Based Chemofluidic Actuation System

[+] Author and Article Information
Navneet Gulati

 Eaton Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN 55344

Eric J. Barth

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235eric.j.barth@vanderbilt.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 129(4), 435-445 (Oct 17, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2718243 History: Received June 23, 2005; Revised October 17, 2006

This paper presents a dynamic model of a monopropellant-based chemofluidic power supply and actuation system. The proposed power supply and actuation system, as presented in prior works, is motivated by the current lack of a viable system that can provide adequate energetic autonomy to human-scale power-comparable untethered robotic systems. As such, the dynamic modeling presented herein is from an energetic standpoint by considering the power and energy exchanged and stored in the basic constituents of the system. Two design configurations of the actuation system are presented and both are modeled. A first-principle based lumped-parameter model characterizing reaction dynamics, hydraulic flow dynamics, pneumatic flow dynamics, and compressible gas dynamics is developed for purposes of control design. Experimental results are presented that validate the model.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Schematic of the centralized monopropellant actuation system; (b) schematic of the direct injection monopropellant actuation system

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Figure 2

(a) Block diagram of the centralized configuration of the chemofluidic actuation system; (b) block diagram of the direct injection configuration of the chemofluidic actuation system

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Figure 3

Steady flow of a liquid through an orifice

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Figure 4

(a) Catalyst pack, actual; (b) catalyst pack, modeled

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Figure 5

Plot showing the mass flow rate of the inlet hydraulic valve as a function of the pressure drop across the valve. The points on the solid line are the measured mass flow rates, and the points on the dashed line are the modeled mass flow rates using the average discharge coefficient.

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Figure 6

(a) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 1s. The solid line is the actual pressure and the dashed line is the modeled pressure. (b) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 2s. The solid line is the actual pressure and the dashed line is the modeled pressure. (c) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 3s. The solid line is the actual pressure and the dashed line is the modeled pressure. (d) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 4s. The solid line is the actual pressure and the dashed line is the modeled pressure. (e) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 5s. The solid line is the actual pressure and the dashed line is the modeled pressure. (f) Change in pressure inside the fixed volume cylinder with a cyclic opening and closing of the inlet valve for 1s. Solid, actual pressure; dashed, modeled pressure.

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Figure 7

(a) Change in pressure inside the variable volume cylinder held at a 1in. stroke length with a commanded inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 50 ms for four separate runs. Solid, actual pressure; dashed, modeled pressure. (b) Change in pressure inside the variable volume cylinder held at a 1in. stroke length with a commanded exhaust valve opening time of 120ms for two separate runs. Solid, actual pressure; dashed, modeled pressure.

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Figure 8

(a) Change in pressure inside the variable volume cylinder held at a 4in. stroke length with a commanded inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 50ms for four separate runs. Solid, actual pressure; dashed, modeled pressure. (b) Change in pressure inside the variable volume cylinder held at a 4in. stroke length with a commanded exhaust valve opening time of 120ms for two separate runs. Solid, actual pressure; dashed, modeled pressure.

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Figure 9

Change in pressure inside the variable volume cylinder with an inlet hydraulic valve opening time of 50ms and a variable stroke length imposed by a variable load on the piston

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