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Technical Briefs

Active Control of Vehicle Transient Powertrain Noise Using a Twin-FXLMS Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
Jie Duan, Mingfeng Li

Vibro-Acoustics and Sound Quality Research Laboratory, School of Dynamic Systems, Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 598 Rhodes Hall, P.O. Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072

Teik C. Lim1

Vibro-Acoustics and Sound Quality Research Laboratory, School of Dynamic Systems, Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 598 Rhodes Hall, P.O. Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072teik.lim@uc.edu

Ming-Ran Lee, Wayne Vanhaaften, Ming-Te Cheng, Takeshi Abe

Department of Powertrain NVH R&D, Research and Advanced Engineering Center, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48124

1

Corresponding author.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 133(3), 034501 (Mar 23, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003386 History: Received January 31, 2010; Revised November 25, 2010; Published March 23, 2011; Online March 23, 2011

Powertrain noise is a major component of vehicle interior noise and thus has a significant effect on the overall sound quality. It is typically dominated by harmonics in the lower audible frequency range, which are directly related to the engine firing orders. In order to achieve a more comfortable environment and pleasing driving experience, an active noise control (ANC) applying advanced filtered-x least mean squares (FXLMS ) algorithm is employed to reduce the vehicle interior noise by targeting these harmonics. The proposed ANC system is designed to control multiple orders of the engine noise response simultaneously. It is also uniquely formulated with a twin-FXLMS algorithm to prevent harmonic interference that often resulted in overshoot at some adjacent orders, especially at low engine speed range where the reference sinusoids are close together. In fact, the interference issue is one of the critical problems that previously plagued the use of the conventional FXLMS algorithm. The basic design of the twin-FXLMS algorithm splits the adaptive filter into two sets. This allows different sum of reference sinusoids to be fed into each adaptive filter in order to widen the frequency separation between two adjacent harmonics. Finally, the performances of proposed twin-FXLMS are validated by numerical simulations.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Basic configuration of the proposed active noise control system based on the twin-FXLMS algorithm

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Figure 2

Estimated engine speed from tachometer signal for the ramp-up speed case

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Figure 3

Frequency response function of the secondary path dynamics

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Figure 4

Comparison of control results between conventional FXLMS and twin-FXLMS algorithms: (a) 1.5th order, (b) 2nd order, (c) 2.5th order, (d) 3rd order, and (e) 3.5th order. (Keys: Solid line ––, baseline noise response; dashed line - - -, conventional FXLMS algorithm; and dotted line ⋯⋯⋯, proposed twin-FXLMS algorithm.)

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