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Research Papers

PCCI Control Authority of a Modern Diesel Engine Outfitted With Flexible Intake Valve Actuation

[+] Author and Article Information
Anup M. Kulkarni, Karla C. Stricker, Angeline Blum

Energy Center, Herrick Laboratories, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Gregory M. Shaver

Energy Center, Herrick Laboratories, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, INgshaver@purdue.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 132(5), 051009 (Aug 23, 2010) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002106 History: Received September 08, 2008; Revised April 15, 2010; Published August 23, 2010; Online August 23, 2010

Premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), an advanced mode combustion strategy, promises to simultaneously deliver the fuel efficiency of diesel combustion and the ultralow NOx emissions that usually require advanced exhaust aftertreatment. A flexible, computationally efficient, and whole engine simulation model for a 2007 6.7 l diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), variable geometry turbocharging (VGT), and common rail fuel injection was validated after extensive experimentation. This model was used to develop strategies for highly fuel-efficient and ultralow NOx emission PCCI. The primary aim of this modeling investigation is to determine the PCCI control authority present on a modern diesel engine outfitted with both conventional actuators (multipulse fuel injectors, EGR valve, and VGT) and flexible intake valve closure modulation, which dictates the effective compression ratio. The results indicate that early fuel injection coupled with ECR reduction and modest amounts of EGR yield a well-timed PCCI exhibiting 70%+ reductions in NOx with no fuel consumption penalty over a significant portion of the engine operating range.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Engine schematic—actuators noted with dashed lines

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Figure 2

Torque-speed curve for the modern six-cylinder engine

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Figure 3

Key steps to achieve “effective PCCI:” includes simultaneous modulation of fuel injection, IVC, and VGT

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Figure 4

Injection profile for baseline and injection modulation cases

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Figure 5

Effect of early fuel injection on ignition delay and 50% burn point (ignition delay=time between start of injection and onset of combustion; CA 50%=crank angle at which 1/2 the fuel has been consumed)

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Figure 6

Effect of early fuel injection on normalized apparent heat release rate

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Figure 7

Effect of early fuel injection on burn duration

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Figure 8

Effect of early fuel injection on peak cylinder pressure and pressure rise rate

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Figure 9

Effect of early fuel injection on burned zone temperature

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Figure 10

Effect of early fuel injection on maximum bulk temperature

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Figure 11

Effect of early fuel injection on NOx emissions

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Figure 12

Effect of early fuel injection on work output and fuel consumption

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Figure 13

Valve profile diagrams for IVCM

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Figure 14

Effect of IVCM on cylinder trapped mass

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Figure 15

Effect of IVCM on fuel-air ratio

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Figure 16

Effect of IVCM on ignition delay and 50% burn point

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Figure 17

Effect of IVCM on normalized apparent heat release rate

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Figure 18

Effect of IVCM on burned fuel fraction

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Figure 19

Effect of IVCM on peak cylinder pressure and pressure rise rate

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Figure 20

Effect of IVCM on burned zone temperature

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Figure 21

Effect of IVCM on NOx emissions

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Figure 22

Effect of IVCM on maximum bulk temperature

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Figure 23

Effect of VGT modulation on exhaust and intake manifold pressure

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Figure 24

Effect of VGT modulation on EGR fraction. Note: in all cases the EGR valve is fully open.

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Figure 25

Effect of VGT modulation on trapped mass

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Figure 26

Effect of VGT modulation on burned zone temperature

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Figure 27

Effect of VGT modulation on NOx emissions

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Figure 28

Effect of VGT modulation on maximum bulk temperature

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Figure 29

Effect of VGT modulation on burned fuel fraction

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Figure 30

Effect of VGT modulation on work output and fuel consumption

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Figure 31

Comparison of injection profile and apparent heat release rate for baseline and “effective PCCI” mode (case 19)

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Figure 32

Comparison of NOx emissions for baseline and “effective PCCI” mode (case 19)

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Figure 33

Comparison of in-cylinder temperature for baseline and “effective PCCI” mode (case 19)

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Figure 34

Comparison of burned zone temperature for baseline and “effective PCCI” mode (case 19)

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Figure 35

Comparison of in-cylinder pressure for baseline and “effective PCCI” mode (case 19)

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Figure 36

Torque-speed curve for the modern six-cylinder engine showing all the “effective PCCI” cases

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