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Research Papers

Self-Sensing Active Magnetic Dampers for Vibration Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Angelo Bonfitto, Xavier De Lépine, Mario Silvagni

Mechatronics Laboratory, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24-10129 Torino, Italy

Andrea Tonoli

Department of Mechanics, Mechatronics Laboratory, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24-10129 Torino, Italyandrea.tonoli@polito.it

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 131(6), 061006 (Nov 10, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000069 History: Received October 16, 2008; Revised May 27, 2009; Published November 10, 2009; Online November 10, 2009

The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of a self-sensing strategy in the case of an electromagnetic damper for the vibration control of flexible structures and rotors. The study has been performed in the case of a single degree of freedom mechanical oscillator actuated by a couple of electromagnets. The self-sensing system is based on a Luenberger observer. Two sets of parameters have been used: nominal ones (based on simplifications on the actuator model) and identified ones. In the latter case, the parameters of the electromechanical model used in the observer are identified starting from the open-loop system response. The observed states are used to close a state-feedback loop with the objective of increasing the damping of the system. The results show that the damping performance are good in both cases, although much better in the second one. Furthermore, the good correlation between the closed-loop model response and the experimental results validates the modeling, the identification procedure, the control design, and its implementation. The paper concludes on a sensitivity analysis, in which the influence of the model parameters on the closed-loop response is shown.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 5

Frequency response of the test rig in open-loop configuration and comparison with the model. Solid and dashed lines are the model and the plant frequency responses, respectively.

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Figure 6

Frequency response of the test rig in closed-loop configuration and comparison with the model. Solid and dashed lines are the model and the plant frequency responses, respectively.

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Figure 4

Voltage to current transfer function (admittance). Solid and dashed lines are the identified model and the plant admittance, respectively. The dotted line represents the admittance evaluated by means of the nominal expression of the inductance (L0=Γ/x0).

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Figure 9

Sensitivity analysis. × corresponds to the closed-loop poles associated to the model modified with the smallest relative error leading to instability. ◇ symbol refers to the open-loop system poles, while ○ and ◻ refer to the observer eig(A−LC) and the state-feedback controller eig(A−BK) poles with the identified model, respectively. (a) Sensitivity of R (b) sensitivity of L0, and (c) sensitivity of k.

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Figure 2

Photo of the test rig

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Figure 7

Time response of the test rig to an impulse excitation. The time response of the system in two different configurations is plotted as follows: open-loop (dashed line) and closed-loop based on the nominal inductance (solid line).

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Figure 8

Time response of the test rig to an impulse excitation. The time response of the system in two different configurations is plotted as follows: open-loop (dashed line) and closed-loop based on the identified model (solid line).

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