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Research Papers

Enhanced Performance and Stability in Pneumatic Servosystems With Supplemental Mechanical Damping

[+] Author and Article Information
Keith W. Wait

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 351592, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1592keith.w.wait@vanderbilt.edu

Michael Goldfarb

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 351592, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1592michael.goldfarb@vanderbilt.edu

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 132(4), 041012 (Jun 18, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001796 History: Received June 02, 2009; Revised March 23, 2010; Published June 18, 2010; Online June 18, 2010

The authors present a model-based analysis of a position-velocity-acceleration-controlled pneumatic actuator that indicates that supplementing the pneumatic actuator with mechanical damping can significantly increase the gain margin, tracking accuracy, and disturbance rejection of a closed-loop-controlled pneumatic servoactuator. In order to validate the model-based analysis and purported performance and stability benefits provided by supplemental damping, experiments were performed on a single-degree-of-freedom pneumatic servosystem. Measurements conducted on the experimental setup, which validate the respective improvements in stability margin, tracking accuracy, and disturbance rejection, are described.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of a typical pneumatic servoactuator

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Figure 2

System block diagram of typical pneumatic servoactuator with PVA compensator

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Figure 3

Root locus of typical pneumatic servoactuator with idealized PVA controller

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Figure 4

Root locus of realistic PVA-controlled pneumatic servoactuator, including the effect of compensator poles (i.e., effect of filtering)

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Figure 5

Root locus of PVA-controlled pneumatic servoactuator with the addition of a damper in the open loop

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Figure 6

Model of a force disturbance on the output of a PVA-controlled pneumatic servoactuator

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Figure 7

Single-degree-of-freedom experimental setup (shown with supplemental damper attached to slide)

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Figure 8

Nominal servoactuator plant at maximum loop gain for stable tracking (k=40 g/m s)

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Figure 9

Nominal servoactuator at loop gain of k=53 g/m s, demonstrating oscillatory limit cycling behavior

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Figure 10

Servoactuator with supplemental damping at maximum loop gain for stable tracking (k=293 g/m s)

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Figure 11

(a) Step response for PVA-controlled servoactuator with and without supplemental damping, both at 90% of maximum loop gain; (b) close-up of steady-state tracking for downward step; and (c) close-up of steady-state tracking for upward step

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Figure 12

(a) Step response for PVA-controlled servoactuator with and without supplemental damping, both at 90% of maximum loop gain, when subjected to a 9 kg hanging mass disturbance; (b) close-up of steady-state tracking for downward step; and (c) close-up of steady-state tracking for upward step

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Figure 13

Close-up of step response of servoactuator with supplemental damping at maximum loop gain for stable tracking (k=293 g/m s)

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