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Research Papers

Fault-Tolerant Control for Electric Ground Vehicles With Independently-Actuated In-Wheel Motors

[+] Author and Article Information
Rongrong Wang

Junmin Wang1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210wang.1381@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 134(2), 021014 (Jan 12, 2012) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005050 History: Received August 03, 2010; Revised July 25, 2011; Published January 11, 2012; Online January 12, 2012

This paper presents an in-wheel motor fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control method for four-wheel independently actuated (4WIA) electric vehicles. The 4WIA electric vehicle is one of the promising architectures for electric vehicles. While such a vehicle architecture greatly increases the flexibility for vehicle control, it also elevates the requirements on system reliability, safety, and fault tolerance due to the increased number of actuators. A fault diagnosis approach for finding the faulty in-wheel motor/motor driver pair is developed. The proposed diagnosis approach does not need an accurate knowledge on tire-road friction coefficient (TRFC) and is robust to tire force modeling inaccuracies. Based on the in-wheel motor/motor driver fault diagnosis mechanism, a control-allocation based vehicle fault-tolerant control system is designed to accommodate the in-wheel motor/motor driver fault by automatically allocating the control effort among other healthy wheels. Simulations using a high-fidelity, CarSim®, full-vehicle model show the effectiveness of the proposed in-wheel motor/motor driver fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control approaches.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of a vehicle model

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Figure 2

Normalized tire longitudinal force versus slip ratios at different TRFCs

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Figure 3

Diagnosis results for accurate model and TRFC (μ = 0.8, initial speed: 40 km/h)

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Figure 4

Diagnosis result without modeling error (μ = 0.4, initial speed: 15 km/h)

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Figure 5

TRFC and control gain estimations considering modeling error (μ = 0.8, initial speed is 50 km/h)

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Figure 6

Road wheel angle change of front wheels in the J-turn simulation

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Figure 7

Actual torques provided by the four motors, bottom figure shows the zoom-in

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Figure 8

Longitudinal velocity in the J-turn simulation

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Figure 9

Vehicle yaw rate change in the J-turn simulation

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Figure 10

Vehicle trajectory in the J-turn simulation

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Figure 11

Road wheel angle change of front wheels in the single-lane change simulation

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Figure 12

Actual torques provided by the four motors, bottom figure shows the zoom-in

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Figure 13

Longitudinal velocity in the single-lane change simulation

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Figure 14

Yaw rate in the single-lane change simulation

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Figure 15

Lateral velocity in the single-lane change simulation

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Figure 16

Vehicle trajectory in the single-lane change simulation

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Figure 17

Vehicle trajectory in a straight line acceleration case

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