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Research Papers

Control Design for the Active Stabilization of Rail Wheelsets

[+] Author and Article Information
T. X. Mei

School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdomt.x.mei@leeds.ac.uk

H. Li

School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(1), 011002 (Dec 05, 2007) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2807062 History: Received October 05, 2005; Revised April 03, 2007; Published December 05, 2007

Through a detailed control assessment of a conventional railway wheelset, this paper addresses some of the key design issues in the development of active primary suspensions for the stabilization control of railway vehicles. It reveals the basic feedback requirements for achieving adequate stability and hence provides a useful insight of how active controllers may be structured. For the control design, a number of factors in addition to the stabilization are considered including the actuation requirements, creep forces at the wheel-rail contact, track following as well as robustness against parameter variations. Based on the outcome of the control analysis, the study proposes a design and optimization procedure for the development of active wheelset control. The design method is applied to a two-axle vehicle in a case study, which shows that the new design approach is advantageous when compared with other design methods previously studied.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Plan-view diagram of a single wheelset

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Figure 2

Frequency response of control torque to track lateral displacement

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Figure 3

Frequency response of wheel-rail deflection to the track lateral displacement

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Figure 4

Frequency response of control effort to track lateral displacement

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Figure 5

Frequency responses of wheel lateral displacement to the track input

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Figure 6

Control gain G2 versus control effort Tw and creep force Fx (rms value)

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Figure 7

Control gain G2 versus wheel-rail lateral deflection (rms value)

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Figure 8

Control gain G0 versus Tw, Fx, and Fy (rms value, at the damping of 0.3)

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Figure 9

Control robustness (G2×G1∕1000)

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Figure 10

Creep coefficient versus damping ratio (G2×G1∕1000)

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Figure 11

Conicity versus damping ratio (G2×G1∕1000)

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Figure 12

Plan-view diagram of a two-axle vehicle

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Figure 13

Yaw torque due to the longitudinal creep forces on random track

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Figure 14

Lateral displacement and yaw angle of the leading wheelset (Controller 1)

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Figure 15

Lateral and yaw velocities of the leading wheelset (Controller 1)

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Figure 16

Lateral displacements and yaw angles of the two wheelsets on a high speed curve

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Figure 17

Control effort on a high speed curve

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