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Research Papers

Whirling-Beam Self-Tuning Vibration Absorber

[+] Author and Article Information
Douglas Ivers

 Lord Corporation R&D, 110 Lord Drive, Cary, NC 27511

Robert Wilson

 Confidential Design, 433 West Street, Suite 9, Amherst, MA 01002

Donald Margolis

Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031009 (Apr 29, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2907399 History: Received November 03, 2004; Revised September 06, 2007; Published April 29, 2008

A classic tuned vibration absorber (TVA) is a device that, when attached to a structure, will greatly reduce the motion of the attachment at a specific excitation frequency. When a fixed frequency input is present, a TVA can be manufactured for the specific frequency input. When the input frequency changes during the course of operation, then an active adaptive TVA can be used where sensors, signal conditioning, and power are provided so that the tuned frequency can be varied over some range. A self-tuning vibration absorber (STVA) is a device that uses energy from the vibrating structure to produce some physical motion that changes the tuned frequency of the device. Through proper design, the tuned frequency will change in the appropriate direction and then stop changing when the tuned frequency matches the input frequency. This paper addresses the physics of one realization of a STVA and shows both analytical and experimental results.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the whirling-beam STVA works

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Figure 2

Schematic of a simple system to assist in understanding the STVA

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Figure 3

Bond graph of the simple system from Fig. 1

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Figure 4

Phase response of the system from Fig. 3 showing how asymmetry causes “whirl”

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Figure 5

A cantilever beam with two loads and its bond graph representation

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Figure 6

The beam and moving mass, M, position, and angle, ϕ

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Figure 7

The beam and moving mass, M, interface

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Figure 8

The whirling-beam STVA nonlinear bond graph

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Figure 9

Components of the STVA

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Figure 10

Photo of the STVA

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Figure 11

Test setup with the STVA mounted on a simple structure

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Figure 12

Frequency response for the mass located full outboard; structure shunted to input

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Figure 13

Frequency response for the mass located full inboard; structure shunted to input

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Figure 14

Sine sweep frequency responses with the mass free to track

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Figure 15

Reduction in structure vibration provided by the STVA

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Figure 16

Convergence from 42Hzto38Hz of (a) undamped acceleration, (b) damped acceleration, and (c) structure acceleration

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Figure 17

Convergence from 33Hzto38Hz of (a) undamped acceleration, (b) damped acceleration, and (c) structure acceleration

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Figure 18

Orbiting motion of the mass during convergence from 42Hzto38Hz. The orbit is in the counterclockwise direction.

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Figure 19

Orbiting motion of the mass during convergence from 33Hzto38Hz. The progression of time is encoded in shades of gray. The orbit is in the clockwise direction.

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Figure 20

Simulation of the motion of the tuning mass for an increase (lower curve) and decrease (upper curve) in forcing frequency

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Figure 21

Acceleration of the structure when the input frequency is lowered and the tuning mass moves to a new location

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Figure 22

Acceleration of the structure when the input frequency is raised and the tuning mass moves to a new location

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