0
Technical Briefs

Automotive Thermostat Valve Configurations: Enhanced Warm-Up Performance

[+] Author and Article Information
T. Mitchell

 SICK Incorporated, Minneapolis, MN 55438

M. Salah

Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Hashemite University, Zarqa, 13115 Jordan

J. Wagner

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

D. Dawson

Department of Electrical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 131(4), 044501 (Apr 29, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3117183 History: Received March 06, 2007; Revised January 27, 2009; Published April 29, 2009

The automotive cooling system has unrealized potential to improve internal combustion engine performance through enhanced coolant temperature control and reduced parasitic losses. Advanced automotive thermal management systems use controllable actuators (e.g., smart thermostat valve, variable speed water pump, and electric radiator fan) that must work in harmony to control engine temperature. One important area of cooling system operation is warm-up, during which fluid flow is regulated between the bypass and radiator loops. A fundamental question arises regarding the usefulness of the common thermostat valve. In this paper, four different thermostat configurations were analyzed, with accompanying linear and nonlinear control algorithms, to investigate warm-up behaviors and thermostat valve operations. The configurations considered include factory, two-way valve, three-way valve, and no valve. Representative experimental testing was conducted on a steam-based thermal bench to examine the effectiveness of each valve configuration in the engine cooling system. The results clearly demonstrate that the three-way valve has the best performance as noted by the excellent warm-up time, temperature tracking, and cooling system power consumption.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Five thermostat valve configurations to enhance fluid flow control; note the two thermocouples, Te(t) and Tr(t), and fluid flow meter after the coolant pump

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic of thermal test bench with actual cooling system components, engine block, sensors, and steam heat exchanger

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Case 1—Factory configuration with (a) engine and radiator temperatures for a desired engine temperature Ted(t), (b) air mass flow rate through the radiator fan, (c) coolant mass flow rate through the pump, and (d) normalized valve position

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Case 3—Three-way valve configuration with (a) engine and radiator temperatures for a desired engine temperature Ted(t), (b) air mass flow rate through the radiator fan, (c) coolant mass flow rate through the water pump, and (d) normalized valve position

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In