0
Research Papers

Bond Graph Modeling of a Two-Stage Pressure Relief Valve

[+] Author and Article Information
Osama Gad

Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering and Petroleum,
Kuwait University,
P.O. Box 5969,
Safat 13060, Kuwait
e-mail: osama.gad@ku.edu.kw

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control. Manuscript received July 5, 2012; final manuscript received February 18, 2013; published online April 2, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yang Shi.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 135(4), 041001 (Apr 02, 2013) (12 pages) Paper No: DS-12-1206; doi: 10.1115/1.4023768 History: Received July 05, 2012; Revised February 18, 2013

This study examined the use of bond graphs for the modeling and simulation of a fluid power system component. A new method is presented for creating the bond graph model, based upon a previously developed mathematical model. A nonlinear dynamic bond graph model for a two-stage pressure relief valve has been developed in this paper. Bond graph submodels were constructed considering each element of the studied valve assembly. The overall bond graph model of the valve was developed by combining these submodels using junction structures. Causality was then assigned in order to obtain a computational model, which could be simulated. The simulation results of the causal bond graph model were compared with those of a mathematical model, which had been also developed in this paper based on the same assumptions. The results were found to correlate very well both in the shape of the curves, magnitude, and response times. The causal bond graph model was verified experimentally in the dynamic mode of operation. As a result of comparison, bond graphs can quickly and accurately model the dynamics in a fluid power control system component. During the simulation study, it was found that nonlinearity occur due to three factors: changes in pressure, which cause nonlinear velocity changes of the flow rate; changes in the throttling area of the valve restriction, which usually changes nonlinearly; and changes in the discharge coefficient of the throttling area of the valve restriction, which does not remain constant.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Bond graph submodel of the inlet cavity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Opening area of the piston element

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the studied relief valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The studied pressure relief valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Combining bond graph submodels of the inlet cavity and piston element

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Combining bond graph submodels of the inlet cavity, piston element, and first cavity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Pilot stage throttling area

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Combining bond graph submodels of the inlet cavity, piston element, first cavity, and second cavity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Combining bond graph submodels of the inlet cavity, piston element, first cavity, second cavity, and poppet element

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Overall bond graph model of the studied valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Bond graph 20-sim simulation model of the studied valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Simulation results of the dynamic response of the studied valve: (a) supply pressure P and (b) control pressure P1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Measured and simulated results of the dynamic response of the studied valve supply pressure P

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Measured and simulated results of the dynamic response of the studied valve control pressure P1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In