0
Technical Brief

Research on Air Content Estimation of Tributyl Phosphate Hydraulic Fluids: A Novel Approach Based on the Vacuum Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaoping Ouyang

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power
Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027, China
e-mail: ouyangxp@hotmail.com

Boqian Fan

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power
Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027, China
e-mail: felix.zju@gmail.com

Huayong Yang

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power
Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027, China
e-mail: yhy@zju.edu.cn

Rong Qing

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power
Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027, China

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received November 2, 2012; final manuscript received October 22, 2013; published online December 9, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yang Shi.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 136(2), 024503 (Dec 09, 2013) (5 pages) Paper No: DS-12-1358; doi: 10.1115/1.4025814 History: Received November 02, 2012; Revised October 22, 2013

The air content in hydraulic transmission fluids significantly reduces bulk modulus of the fluid and causes a drop in the stiffness and response of the hydraulic system. It is consequently very important to monitor the air content in hydraulic fluid for ensuring the hydraulic works in good condition. In this paper, a novel method is presented in which the sampled fluid flows slowly into a vacuum chamber and the pressure of separated air is measured. A model of pressure-time characteristics is established, with moisture content taken into account as well, since moisture is volatile in vacuum and its content in tributyl phosphate (TBP) based fluid is usually too high to be neglected. The model can be simplified, which turned out to be a nonlinear least square problem. Comparison between the measured and calculated value shows that the model matches well with the experimental data.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Topics: Pressure , Fluids , Vacuum , Water
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of the measurement principle

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of the dynamic model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Difference in pressure rising in the vacuum chamber with different fluids

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Measured and calculated pressure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Error between measured and calculated pressure

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In