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Research Papers

Sensitivity Analysis and Experimental Research on Ball Bearing Early Fault Diagnosis Based on Testing Signal From Casing

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Chen

Professor
College of Civil Aviation,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China
e-mail: cgzyx@263.net

T. F. Hao, H. F. Wang, B. Zhao, J. Wang, X. Y. Cheng

College of Civil Aviation,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received March 3, 2013; final manuscript received June 25, 2014; published online August 8, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Nariman Sepehri.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 136(6), 061009 (Aug 08, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: DS-13-1093; doi: 10.1115/1.4027926 History: Received March 03, 2013; Revised June 25, 2014

The ball bearings of an aero-engine are key parts that frequently fail, and it is very important to effectively carry out fault diagnosis of the ball bearings. However, in the present research work, the ball bearing faults characteristics are extracted mainly from the bearing house signals, it is well known that usually only the casing signals can be measured in practical aero-engine test, and the ball bearing faults characteristics will greatly weaken after transmitting to the casing from the bearing house, therefore, it is very important to extract the fault characteristics of ball bearings from casing vibration signals for the ball bearing fault diagnosis in the practical aero-engine. In this study, simulation experiments for ball bearing faults are conducted using two rotor experimental rigs with casings. In addition, by means of the impulse response method, the transfer characteristics from the ball bearings to casing measuring points are measured, and a sensitivity analysis is performed. Faults are created on the inner ring, outer ring, and ball of the ball bearings in the two experimental rigs. The ball bearing experiments are carried out, and the fault features are extracted by means of a wavelet envelope analysis. The experimental results indicate that, with high connection stiffness between the bearing house and the casing, there is little vibration attenuation. However, with low connection stiffness, the vibration attenuation is great. After the impulse vibrations caused by the ball bearing faults are transmitted to the casing, the casing vibration is very weak and is often submerged in other signals. However, the ball bearing fault characteristic frequencies can still be effectively extracted from the weak casing vibration signals by using a wavelet envelope analysis. The research results in this study provide an experimental basis for a ball bearing fault diagnosis based on a casing test signal from a practical aero-engine.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Compressor rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 2

Aero-engine rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 3

Impulse experiment with compressor rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 4

Impulse experiment with aero-engine rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 5

Impulse response of compressor rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 6

Impulse response of a aero-engine rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 7

Faults in 6214 ball bearing of compressor rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 8

Faults in 6206 ball bearing of aero-engine rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 9

Test-site photo of compressor rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 10

Test-site photo of aero-engine rotor experimental rig

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Fig. 12

Frequency spectrum (0–5000 Hz)

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Fig. 14

Wavelet envelope spectrum

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Wavelet envelope spectrum

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Frequency spectrum (0–5000 Hz)

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Wavelet envelope spectrum

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Frequency spectrum (0–5000 Hz)

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Wavelet envelope spectrum

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Frequency spectrum (0–5000 Hz)

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Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Wavelet envelope spectrum

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Frequency spectrum (0–5000 Hz)

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Fig. 33

Frequency spectrum (0–500 Hz)

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Fig. 34

Wavelet envelope spectrum

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