0
Technical Brief

Control-Oriented Gas Exchange Model for Diesel Engines Utilizing Variable Intake Valve Actuation

[+] Author and Article Information
Lyle Kocher

Ray W. Herrick Laboratories,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: kocherl@purdue.edu

Ed Koeberlein

Ray W. Herrick Laboratories,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: ekoeberl@purdue.edu

Karla Stricker

Ray W. Herrick Laboratories,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: kcstrick@purdue.edu

D. G. Van Alstine

Ray W. Herrick Laboratories,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: dvanalst@purdue.edu

Greg Shaver

Ray W. Herrick Laboratories,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: gshaver@purdue.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received October 24, 2011; final manuscript received April 25, 2014; published online August 8, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Eric J. Barth.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 136(6), 064501 (Aug 08, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: DS-11-1331; doi: 10.1115/1.4027960 History: Received October 24, 2011; Revised April 25, 2014

Modeling and control of the gas exchange process in modern diesel engines is critical for the promotion and control of advanced combustion strategies. However, most modeling efforts to date use complex stand-alone simulation packages that are not easily integrated into, or amenable for the synthesis of, engine control systems. Simpler control-oriented models have been developed; however, in many cases, they do not directly capture the complete dynamic interaction of air handling system components and flows in multicylinder diesel engines with variable geometry turbocharging (VGT), high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and flexible intake valve actuation. Flexibility in the valvetrain directly impacts the gas exchange process not only through the effect on volumetric efficiency but also through the combustion process and resulting exhaust gas enthalpy utilized to drive the turbomachinery. This paper describes a low-order, five state model of the air handling system for a multicylinder variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine with cooled EGR and flexible intake valve actuation, validated against 286 steady state and 62 transient engine operating points. The model utilizes engine speed, engine fueling, EGR valve position, VGT nozzle position, and intake valve closing (IVC) time as inputs to the model. The model outputs include calculation of the engine flows as well as the exhaust temperature exiting the cylinders. The gas exchange model captures the dynamic effects of the not only the standard air handling actuators (EGR valve position and VGT position) but also IVC timing, exercised over their useful operating ranges. The model's capabilities are enabled through the use of analytical functions to describe the performance of the turbocharger, eliminating the need to use look-up maps; a physically based control-oriented exhaust gas enthalpy submodel and a physically based volumetric efficiency submodel.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of a modern diesel engine

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of VVA system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Gas exchange model states and flows

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Gas exchange model inputs, states, and outputs

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Volumetric efficiency over IVC sweep at 1850 rpm and 407 N·m

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Experimental validation data operating locations

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Steady-State model results at 2300 rpm and 522 N·m

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Steady-state model results at 1850 rpm and 407 N·m

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Transient model results for EGR valve and VGT actuator step ups at 2300 rpm and 522 N·m

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Transient model results for EGR valve and VGT actuator step downs at 1850 rpm and 407 N·m

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Transient model results for IVC actuator step down at 1850 rpm and 407 N·m

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In