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Research Papers

Searching and Localizing a Radio Target by an Unmanned Flying Vehicle Using Bootstrap Filtering

[+] Author and Article Information
Fariborz Saghafi

Associate Professor
Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Sharif University of Technology,
Azadi Street, P.O. Box 11365-11155,
Tehran 11365-11155, Iran
e-mail: saghafi@sharif.edu

Sayyed Majid Esmailifar

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Sharif University of Technology,
Azadi Street, P.O. Box 11365-11155,
Tehran 11365-11155, Iran
e-mail: esmailifar@ae.sharif.edu

A coordinate system attached to the vehicle and its first axis is aligned with the forward direction of the vehicle.

A coordinate system fixed on the ground.

A coordinate system which its first axis is align with the wind direction.

Speed control system keeps the vehicle speed to be 30 m/s.

Covariance matrix of wk is related to the σ value of target position variance.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received June 6, 2013; final manuscript received August 11, 2014; published online September 11, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Alexander Leonessa.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 137(2), 021008 (Sep 11, 2014) (12 pages) Paper No: DS-13-1225; doi: 10.1115/1.4028313 History: Received June 06, 2013; Revised August 11, 2014

In this article, an algorithm has been developed to search and localize a radio target in a marine area. This algorithm consists of two main parts, estimation and guidance. In the estimation part, bootstrap filtering has been employed to extract the target states from measurements. Although, by utilizing bootstrap filter, the target states can be estimated without requiring special maneuvers, exploiting proper guidance law to maximize the information gain can significantly enhance the localization performance. For evaluating the developed algorithm, an accurate simulation software with six degrees of freedom mathematical model including autopilot is used. Obtained statistical results from different simulation runs for both stationary and moving targets are presented to demonstrate the performance of the developed algorithm.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of processes from best informative point to control surface angles

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Fig. 3

Acceleration autopilot control systems for BTT flying vehicle

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Fig. 4

Designed normal acceleration control system regulates the pitch rate and tracks the normal acceleration command. (a) Trajectory of the flying vehicle, (b) normal accelerations, (c) lateral accelerations, and (d) bank angles.

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Fig. 5

The graphs of autopilot operational parameters in a turn maneuver. (a) Trajectory of the flying vehicle, (b) normal accelerations, (c) lateral accelerations, and (d) bank angles.

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Fig. 6

The graphs of autopilot operational parameters in a sinusoidal maneuver. (a) Trajectory of the flying vehicle, (b) commanded acceleration in geographic coordinate system, (c) commanded and real BTT states, and (d) control surfaces.

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Fig. 7

The graphs of guidance operational parameters in guiding to a desired point. (a) Trajectory of the flying vehicle, (b) commanded acceleration in geographic coordinate system, (c) commanded and real BTT states, and (d) control surfaces.

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Fig. 8

The graphs of guidance operational parameters in guiding to a predefined path

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Fig. 2

An aircraft which is banking to turn

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Fig. 9

Trajectories of the flying vehicle in three samples of the searches for stationary targets

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Fig. 10

The trends of errors and standard deviations for three sample searches in Fig. 9. (a) Stationary target search detection time and (b) stationary target search income.

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Fig. 11

Statistical graphs for stationary targets with different initial distances

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Fig. 12

Trajectories of the flying vehicle in three samples of the searches for moving targets

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Fig. 13

The trends of errors and standard deviations for three sample searches in Fig. 12. (a) Search success percentage, (b) moving target search detection time, and (c) moving target search income.

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Fig. 14

Statistical graphs for moving targets with different velocities

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