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Research Papers

Compound Control Strategy Based on Active Disturbance Rejection for Selected Catalytic Reduction systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Jinbiao Ning

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
e-mail: ningj4@mcmaster.ca

Fengjun Yan

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
e-mail: yanfeng@mcmaster.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received March 31, 2014; final manuscript received October 7, 2014; published online December 10, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Gregory Shaver.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 137(5), 051008 (May 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: DS-14-1147; doi: 10.1115/1.4028790 History: Received March 31, 2014; Revised October 07, 2014; Online December 10, 2014

Urea-based selected catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are effective ways in diesel engine after-treatment systems to meet increasingly stringent emission regulations. To achieve high NOx reduction efficiency and low NH3 slip, the control of the SCR system becomes more challenging, especially in transient operating conditions with model uncertainties. To effectively address this issue, this paper proposed a compound control strategy with a switching mechanism between an active disturbance rejection (ADR) controller and a zero-input controller. The ADR controller estimates and rejects the total (internal and external) disturbances from the SCR system when the exhaust gas temperature is high and its variation is small. The zero-input controller is used to lower ammonia surface coverage ratio to avoid high ammonia slip when exhaust gas temperature suddenly rises. The proposed control strategy is validated through a high-fidelity GT-Power simulation for a light-duty diesel engine over steady states and federal test procedure (FTP-75) test cycle. Its effectiveness is demonstrated especially in rapidly transient conditions with model uncertainties.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Urea base SCR system for diesel engine

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Fig. 2

ADRC combined with a switch controller

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Fig. 3

ADRC controller design for SCR system

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Fig. 4

The conditions before and after the input hits zero

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Fig. 5

The light-duty vehicle model built in GT-Power

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Fig. 6

Ammonia input and output of compound control strategy when engine on steady state

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Fig. 7

NOx reduction of compound control strategy when engine on steady state

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Fig. 8

The speed tracking in the FTP-75 test

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Fig. 9

The temperature out of the engine

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Fig. 10

The mole fraction of the NO and NO2 at upstream of the SCR system

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Fig. 11

The flow mass rate of the exhaust gas out of engine

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Fig. 12

The variation of the ammonia surface storage ratio

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Fig. 13

The ammonia input and downstream ammonia of the SCR system

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Fig. 14

The variation of the ammonia surface storage ratio

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Fig. 15

Ammonia slip after SCR system

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Fig. 16

NOx reduction after SCR system

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Fig. 17

Ammonia input at the upstream of SCR system

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Fig. 18

Comparison between compound control and feed-forward control

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Fig. 19

Ammonia slip of urea injection inaccuracy and ammonia storage decrease due to aging

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Fig. 20

SCR-out NOx of urea injection inaccuracy and ammonia storage decrease due to aging

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