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Research Papers

Nonlinear Vehicle Dynamics and Trailer Steering Control of the TowPlow, a Steerable Articulated Snowplowing Vehicle System

[+] Author and Article Information
Jae Young Kang

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California, Davis,
One Shields Avenue,
Davis, CA 95616
e-mail: jykkang@ucdavis.edu

George Burkett, Jr.

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California, Davis,
One Shields Avenue,
Davis, CA 95616
e-mail: gwburkett@ucdavis.edu

Duane Bennett

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California, Davis,
One Shields Avenue,
Davis, CA 95616
e-mail: dabennett@ucdavis.edu

Steven A. Velinsky

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California, Davis,
One Shields Avenue,
Davis, CA 95616
e-mail: savelinsky@ucdavis.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received May 28, 2014; final manuscript received December 22, 2014; published online April 17, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Shankar Coimbatore Subramanian.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 137(8), 081005 (Aug 01, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: DS-14-1229; doi: 10.1115/1.4029527 History: Received May 28, 2014; Revised December 22, 2014; Online April 17, 2015

The TowPlow is a novel type of snowplow that consists of a conventional snowplow vehicle and a steerable, plow-mounted trailer. The system is used to plow two typical traffic lanes simultaneously. In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic model of the TowPlow is developed for longitudinal, lateral, and yaw motions. The model considers nonlinearity through a modified Dugoff’s tire friction model, tire rotation dynamics, and quasi-static load transfer. The model is verified through steady-state and transient tests on an actual TowPlow system. A new snow resistance model is developed to allow simulation of the TowPlow in snow clearing operations. Then, active steering control of the trailer axle is derived with the goal of improving safety and efficiency of the TowPlow. The comparison of the simulation results between the controlled system and the uncontrolled system for cornering, slalom, up and down hill, and split friction coefficient braking maneuvers clearly demonstrates the efficacy of active steering control for the trailer axle of the TowPlow.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Scheme of the tractor unit and forces

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Fig. 2

Scheme of the trailer unit and forces

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Fig. 3

Scheme of the tongue assembly and forces

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Fig. 4

Layout of sensors and microcontrollers

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Fig. 5

Steady-state test results compared with simulation results

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Fig. 6

Transient test inputs for the experiment and simulation

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Fig. 7

Transient test results compared with simulation results

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Fig. 8

Components and scheme of the snow resistance

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Fig. 9

Comparison of (a) longitudinal and (b) lateral snow resistance ratios

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Fig. 10

Cornering simulation results

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Fig. 11

Slalom, up and down hill simulation results

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Fig. 12

Split friction coefficient simulation results—tractor on a wet road (μ0 = 0.6) and trailer on a snow packed road (μ0 = 0.4)

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Fig. 13

Split friction coefficient simulation results—tractor on a snow packed road (μ0 = 0.4) and trailer on a wet road (μ0 = 0.6)

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