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Research Papers

A Hybrid Haptic Sensation for Teleoperation of Hydraulic Manipulators

[+] Author and Article Information
Kourosh Zareinia

Mem. ASME
Project NeuroArm,
University of Calgary,
1C58-HRIC 3280 Hospital Drive NW,
Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada
e-mail: KZareini@ucalgary.ca

Nariman Sepehri

Fellow ASME
Fluid Power and Telerobotics Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Manitoba,
E1-384 EITC, 75A Chancellors Circle,
Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6Canada
e-mail: nariman.sepehri@umanitoba.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received August 2, 2014; final manuscript received March 28, 2015; published online May 28, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Heikki Handroos.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 137(9), 091001 (Sep 01, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: DS-14-1310; doi: 10.1115/1.4030337 History: Received August 02, 2014; Revised March 28, 2015; Online May 28, 2015

In this paper, a control scheme is designed for stable haptic teleoperation of hydraulic manipulators. The controller results in a stable position tracking for the hydraulic actuator (slave) in both unconstrained and constrained motions. The force feedback at the haptic (master) side is a combination of two different sensations. For free motion, the haptic device provides a haptic force based on the position error between the displacements of the master and the slave. The force also serves to alert the operator when the slave is ahead or behind in position tracking of the master. Once the slave comes in contact with the environment, the haptic force is augmented by the interaction force. The uniqueness, continuation, and existence of the Filippov solution to this system with the discontinuity surfaces are proven first. The extension of Lyapunov's stability theory to nonsmooth systems is then employed to prove the stability by constructing a Lyapunov function. The effectiveness of the controller is validated via experimental studies. It is shown that while stable, the system performs well in terms of position tracking of the hydraulic actuator and providing a haptic feel to the operator. The measurements required by the controller are supply pressure, actuator's line pressures, interaction force, and displacements of the master and slave.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Haptic-hydraulic actuator experimental test rig

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Fig. 2

Simulation results for a constant human input Fh=-0.4 N. The hydraulic actuator moves in free motion, i.e., ks = 0 N/m.

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Fig. 3

Simulation results for a constant human input Fh = 2.5 N. The hydraulic actuator is in contact and interacts with environment having stiffness of ks = 180 kN/m.

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Fig. 4

Experimental results given steplike input. Hydraulic actuator moved in free motion (noncontact phase).

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Fig. 5

Experimental results given steplike input. Hydraulic actuator was in contact with the environment having stiffness of ks = 180 kN/m at all time.

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Fig. 6

Experimental results given sinusoidal input. Hydraulic actuator was in noncontact phase (free motion).

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Fig. 7

Experimental results given sinusoidal input. Hydraulic actuator was in contact with the environment having stiffness of ks = 180 kN/m.

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Fig. 8

Experimental results given sinusoidal input. Hydraulic actuator was in free motion (xs < 0) and brought in contact with a spring having stiffness of ks = 180 kN/m (xs > 0). Vertical dashed lines show the changes between contact and noncontact phases.

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Fig. 9

Experimental results given sinusoidal input. Hydraulic actuator was in free motion (xs < 0) and brought in contact with a spring having stiffness of ks = 180 kN/m, (xs > 0). Vertical dashed lines show the changes between contact and noncontact phases.

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