0
Research Papers

Vibration Isolation by an Actively Compliantly Mounted Sensor Applied to a Coriolis Mass-Flow Meter

[+] Author and Article Information
L. (Bert) van de Ridder

Mechanical Automation Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering Technology,
University of Twente,
P.O. Box 217,
Enschede 7500AE, The Netherlands
e-mail: l.vanderidder@alumnus.utwente.nl

Wouter B. J. Hakvoort

Mechanical Automation Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering Technology,
University of Twente,
Enschede 7500AE, The Netherlands;
Demcon Advanced Mechatronics,
Institutenweg 25,
Enschede 7521PH, The Netherlands
e-mail: wouter.hakvoort@demcon.nl

Johannes van Dijk

Mechanical Automation Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering Technology,
University of Twente,
P.O. Box 217,
Enschede 7500AE, The Netherlands

Joost C. Lötters

MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology,
University of Twente,
Enschede 7500AE, The Netherlands;
Bronkhorst High-Tech BV,
Nijverheidsstraat 1A,
Ruurlo 7261AK, The Netherlands

André de Boer

Applied Mechanics Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering Technology,
University of Twente,
P.O. Box 217,
Enschede 7500AE, The Netherlands

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received March 18, 2015; final manuscript received December 1, 2015; published online January 12, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Douglas Bristow.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 138(3), 031005 (Jan 12, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: DS-15-1121; doi: 10.1115/1.4032290 History: Received March 18, 2015; Revised December 01, 2015

In this paper, a vibration isolated design of a Coriolis mass-flow meter (CMFM) is proposed by introducing a compliant connection between the casing and the tube displacement sensors, with the objective to obtain a relative displacement measurement of the fluid conveying tube, dependent on the tube actuation and mass-flow, but independent of external vibrations. The transfer from external vibrations to the relative displacement measurement is analyzed and the design is optimized to minimize this transfer. The influence of external vibrations on a compliant sensor element and the tube are made equal by tuning the resonance frequency and damping of the compliant sensor element and therefore the influence on the relative displacement measurement is minimized. The optimal tuning of the parameters is done actively by acceleration feedback. Based on simulation results, a prototype is built and validated. The validated design shows more than 24 dB reduction of the influence of external vibrations on the mass-flow measurement value of a CMFM, without affecting the sensitivity for mass-flow.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Multibody model of the CMFM (Adopted from Ref. [8]). The tube-window is actuated, by means of act1 and act2, to oscillate around the θtwist-axis. On the casing, external vibrations a0 are applied. Sensors (s1 and s2) measure the relative tube displacements, affected by the actuation, a mass-flow and external vibrations.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

One-dimensional (1D) CMFM model, representing the Coriolis mode. The Coriolis displacement ycor is affected by the Coriolis force Fcor and an external displacement y0.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

One-dimensional CMFM CMS model. Compared to the CMFM model (Fig. 2), the measured Coriolis displacement is relative to the flexibly suspended mass m1.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Transmissibility from external vibrations ay to the Coriolis displacement ycor of the reference system and the CMS system (Eq. (9)). The CMS transmissibility is depicted for the stiffness and damping parameters according to Eq. (8) and for ωCMS=116·2π rad/s and ζCMS=0.01. The region of interest is a 25 Hz band around the actuation frequency ωact.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Influence of the suspension frequency ωCMS on the attenuation of at the actuation frequency ωact for two different fluids (air and water) and the damping ratio ζCMS of the CMS

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

One-dimensional CMFM active CMS model. Compared to the CMFM CMS model (Fig. 3), actuation and sensing means are added to flexibly suspended mass m1.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Transmissibility from external vibrations ay to the Coriolis displacement ycor of the reference system (Eq. (6)) and the CMS system (Eq. (9)). The region of interest is a 25 Hz band around the actuation frequency ωact. The CMS transmissibility is depicted for the passive system and for the active system, whereby the controllers of Eqs. (12) and (15) are used.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Multibody model of the CMFM CMS. Compared to the CMFM model (Fig. 1) the tube displacements (s1 and s2) are not measured relative to the casing any more.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Mechanical design of the 1DOF active CMS. The 1DOF is realized between the casing and the tube-displacement sensor and is sensed by an accelerometer in actuated by a VCM.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Photo of CMFM including the active CMS module

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Six-DOF shaker platform, including DUT, to apply an external vibration on the casing of a CMFM

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Transfer function from U to a1. The experimental result is compared to the model (Eq. (11)) whereby for the model Fa=(m1/meq)U and (k1/m1)=ωCMS,passive2 are used.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Validation of the transmissibility from external vibrations ay to the Coriolis displacement ycor of the CMS system (Eq. (9)) for the passive and active CMS compared to the model. The CMS suspension frequency ωCMS,passive=116·2π rad/s is actively reduced to ωCMS,active=110·2π rad/s. Model parameters are based on the estimated parameters when the CMFM tube is filled with air.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

RMS measurement error for the different applied disturbance levels. Numerical values are given in Table 3.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In