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Research Papers

Enhanced Electromechanical Brake-by-Wire System Using Sliding Mode Controller

[+] Author and Article Information
Mostafa R. A. Atia

Mechatronics Department,
Faculty of Engineering,
AASTMT,
Cairo, Egypt
e-mail: mrostom1@aast.edu

Salem A. Haggag

Department of Automotive Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Ain Shams University,
Cairo, Egypt
e-mail: salem_haggag@yahoo.com

Ahmed M. M. Kamal

Mechatronics Department,
Faculty of Engineering,
AASTMT,
Cairo, Egypt
e-mail: ahmed.mohamed.mk@gmail.com

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received May 16, 2015; final manuscript received January 11, 2016; published online February 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Heikki Handroos.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 138(4), 041003 (Feb 05, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: DS-15-1222; doi: 10.1115/1.4032484 History: Received May 16, 2015; Revised January 11, 2016

The importance of the brake-by-wire (BBW) system emerged from the fact that it replaces all the conventional hydraulic braking system components with electronic signals between sensors, control modules, and electrically driven braking actuators. This conversion has enormously contributed to the braking system performance in terms of responsiveness, integration with other vehicle subsystems, and an adaptive behavior in different driving circumstances. The aim of this research is investigating the sliding mode control (SMC) strategy to a proposed BBW system. To achieve this aim, BBW system is modeled and validated experimentally. The SMC strategy is applied to the model and validated experimentally. Moreover, this research focuses on compensating for the effect of worn pads on braking performance. The experimental work shows that the developed system model gives matched results with the experimental work. Applying SMC to the model shows a good performance in breaking operation with acceptable error. Applying of the SMC to the test rig shows a good performance with acceptable deviations. In addition, the experiments show that the control strategy is able to compensate the wear in braking pads and keep tracking the braking command.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 8

A simulation result of EMBBW using BSMC (braking time is 20 s with boundaries of ±10 rpm)

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Fig. 9

Test results of applying QSMC to EMBBW (braking time is 20 s with boundaries of ±10 rpm)

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Fig. 7

A snapshot of simulink screen of BSMC block diagram

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Fig. 6

Switching function and rules of (a) BSMC and (b) QSMC

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Fig. 5

Results of simulation and real test with a step braking input

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Fig. 4

System block diagram

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Fig. 3

EMBBW system schematic

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Fig. 1

Switching function and rules of (a) SMC and (b) QSMC

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Fig. 10

Test results of applying BSMC to EMBBW (braking time is 20 s with boundaries of ±10 rpm)

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Fig. 11

Test results of applying BSMC to EMBBW with worn pads (braking time is 10 s with boundaries of ±10 rpm)

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Fig. 12

Test results of applying BSMC to EMBBW with worn pads (braking time is 10 s with boundaries of ±20 rpm)

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