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Research Papers

Quantitative Feedback Input Shaping for Flexible-Joint Robot Manipulator

[+] Author and Article Information
Withit Chatlatanagulchai

Control of Robot and Vibration Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Kasetsart University,
50 Ngam Wong Wan Road,
Lat Yao, Chatuchak,
Bangkok 10900, Thailand
e-mail: fengwtc@ku.ac.th

Dumrongsak Kijdech

Control of Robot and Vibration Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Kasetsart University,
50 Ngam Wong Wan Road,
Lat Yao, Chatuchak,
Bangkok 10900, Thailand
e-mail: dumrongsak_kijdech@hotmail.com

Takat Benjalersyarnon

Control of Robot and Vibration Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Kasetsart University,
50 Ngam Wong Wan Road,
Lat Yao, Chatuchak,
Bangkok 10900, Thailand
e-mail: tac_m@msn.com

Supparat Damyot

Control of Robot and Vibration Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Kasetsart University,
50 Ngam Wong Wan Road,
Lat Yao, Chatuchak,
Bangkok 10900, Thailand
e-mail: supparat.d@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received August 10, 2015; final manuscript received February 23, 2016; published online March 30, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Hashem Ashrafiuon.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 138(6), 061006 (Mar 30, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: DS-15-1371; doi: 10.1115/1.4032931 History: Received August 10, 2015; Revised February 23, 2016

Input shaping technique has been applied to flexible-joint robot to suppress its residual vibration from fast point-to-point movement. Input shaping performance deteriorates when the knowledge of the mode parameters of the robot is not accurate. Several robust input shapers were proposed at the expense of longer move time. A novel input shaping system, consisting of a quantitative feedback controller, a feed-forward reference model, and a simple zero-vibration (ZV) input shaper, is proposed in this paper. Advantages over the existing robust input shapers include toleration of substantially larger amount of uncertainty in the mode parameters, shorter move time that does not increase with insensitivity, application to nonlinear and time-varying systems, and suppression of vibration induced by disturbance and noise.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 4

Preliminary simulation result without input shaping: (a) link position, (b) control input, (c) linearized spring constant, (d) deadzone, and (e) backlash

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Fig. 5

Application of the input shaping technique

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Fig. 2

Diagram of the experimental setup and pertaining software and hardware

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Fig. 1

Flexible-joint robot manipulator

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Fig. 3

Top-view diagram of the flexible-joint robot

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Fig. 7

Diagram of the proposed QF-IS

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Fig. 6

Plant templates for eight pertaining frequencies

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Fig. 9

Diagram of the traditional robust input shaping

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Fig. 8

Open-loop shaping: (top) original shape and (bottom) after shaping

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Fig. 15

Link position tracking experimental result for nonlinear plant with time-varying payload: (top) traditional robust input shaping system with ZV input shaper and (bottom) proposed QF-IS system

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Fig. 17

Simulation result of link position under step disturbance: (a) traditional ZVD input shaper under step plant-output disturbance, (b) proposed QF-IS under step plant-output disturbance, (c) traditional ZVD input shaper under step plant-input disturbance, and (d) proposed QF-IS under step plant-input disturbance

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Fig. 10

Bode magnitude plots: (top) the proposed QF-IS system and (bottom) traditional robust input shaping system

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Fig. 11

Link position tracking result for 27 plant variations: (top) traditional robust input shaping system with ZVD input shaper and (bottom) proposed QF-IS system

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Fig. 18

Disturbance rejection: (top) plant-input disturbance rejection and (bottom) plant-output disturbance rejection

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Fig. 14

Comparison of input shaper lengths

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Fig. 16

Simulation result of link position tracking: (a) traditional ZV input shaper with linear plant, (b) traditional ZV input shaper with nonlinear plant, (c) proposed QF-IS with linear plant, and (d) proposed QF-IS with nonlinear plant

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Fig. 12

Comparison of sensitivity curves: (left) percentage vibration as a function of normalized frequency and (right) percentage vibration as a function of damping ratio

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Fig. 13

Comparison between simulation and experiment for the proposed QF-IS: (top) percentage vibration as a function of normalized frequency and (bottom) percentage vibration as a function of damping ratio

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