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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Dynamic Modeling and Control of Off-Centered Bridge Crane Lifts

[+] Author and Article Information
Anthony Garcia

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Virginia Polytechnic and State University,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: Ajgarcia@vt.edu

William Singhose

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: Singhose@gatech.edu

Aldo Ferri

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: Al.Ferri@me.gatech.edu

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received January 15, 2016; final manuscript received October 11, 2016; published online February 6, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Heikki Handroos.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 139(4), 041005 (Feb 06, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: DS-16-1031; doi: 10.1115/1.4035030 History: Received January 15, 2016; Revised October 11, 2016

When cranes lift payloads off the ground, the payload may slide sideways or swing unexpectedly. This motion occurs when the payload is not directly beneath the overhead suspension point of the hoist cable. Given that cable suspension points can be hundreds of feet above the payload, it is difficult for crane operators to know if the hoist cable is vertical before lifting the payload off the ground. If an off-center lift creates substantial horizontal motion, then it can create significant hazards for the operators, the payload, and the surrounding environment. This paper develops a three-dimensional dynamic model that predicts motions of off-centered lifts.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of an off-centered lift

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Fig. 2

Control block diagram of autocentering trolley positioning system

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Fig. 3

Friction model: (a) Stribeck friction and (b) continuous Stribeck friction

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Fig. 4

Payload and ground interaction model

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Fig. 5

Main elements of the crane model: (a) trolley, (b) hook, and (c) payload

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Fig. 6

Experimental setup: (a) side view and (b) overview schematic

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Fig. 7

Bottom corner positions predicted by Peng's model (lift height of 5 cm and initial offset of 1.2 m): (a) horizontal motion and (b) vertical motion

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Fig. 8

Horizontal positions of payload bottom corners (lift height of 5 cm and initial offset of 1.2 m)

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Fig. 9

Vertical positions of payload bottom corners (5 cm lift height and 1.2 m initial offset): (a) simulation results and (b) experimental results

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Fig. 10

Contact instances of payload bottom corners with the ground (lift height of 5 cm and initial offset of 1.2 m): (a) simulation results and (b) experimental results

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Fig. 11

Main elements of three-dimensional crane model: (a) trolley, (b) hook, and (c) payload

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Fig. 13

Payload camera: (a) parallel tape lines on the ground beneath the payload and (b) view of tape lines from the camera on-board the rotating payload

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Fig. 14

Side ABCD—horizontal offset (I-axis) = 0.1 m, horizontal offset (J-axis) = 0.2 m, and height (K-axis) = 20 cm: (a) horizontal corner positions, (b) simulation vertical corner positions, and (c) experimental vertical corner positions

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Fig. 15

Simulated maximum swing amplitudes of corner C against a parameter uncertainty sweep of payload mass

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Fig. 16

Side AECG—horizontal offset (I-axis) = 0.1 m, horizontal offset (J-axis) = 0.2 m, and height (K-axis) = 20 cm: (a) horizontal corner positions, (b) simulation vertical corner positions, and (c) experimental vertical corner positions

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Fig. 17

Visual comparison of three-dimensional model with experiment—horizontal offset (I-axis) = 0.3 m, horizontal offset (J-axis) = 0.6 m, and height (K-axis) = 20 cm

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