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Research Papers

First Principle-Based Control Oriented Model of a Gasoline Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmed Yar

Department of Electrical Engineering,
Capital University of Science and Technology,
Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
e-mail: ahmedyar@gmail.com

A. I. Bhatti

Department of Electrical Engineering,
Capital University of Science and Technology,
Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
e-mail: aib@cust.edu.pk

Qadeer Ahmed

Center for Automotive Research,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43212
e-mail: ahmed.358@osu.edu

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received January 13, 2016; final manuscript received November 1, 2016; published online March 1, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ryozo Nagamune.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 139(5), 051002 (Mar 01, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: DS-16-1028; doi: 10.1115/1.4035174 History: Received January 13, 2016; Revised November 01, 2016

A first principle based-control oriented gasoline engine model is proposed that is based on the mathematical model of the actual piston and crankshaft mechanism. Unlike conventional mean value engine models (MVEMs), which involve approximating the torque production mechanism with a volumetric pump, the proposed model obviates this rather over-simplistic assumption. The alleviation of this assumption leads to the additional features in the model such as crankshaft speed fluctuations and tension in bodies forming the mechanism. The torque production dynamics are derived through Lagrangian mechanics. The derived equations are reduced to a suitable form that can be easily used in the control-oriented model. As a result, the abstraction level is greatly reduced between the engine system and the mathematical model. The proposed model is validated successfully against a commercially available 1.3 L gasoline engine. Being a transparent and more capable model, the proposed model can offer better insight into the engine dynamics, improved control design and diagnosis solutions, and that too, in a unified framework.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Engine system: interconnected air, fuel, and torque production subsystem

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Fig. 2

Configuration of slider crank mechanism

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Fig. 3

Two possible realizations of proposed torque production subsystem: (a) all inputs are taken as torques acting on the Crankshaft and (b) torques and forces are taken separately

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Fig. 4

Structure of the optimization problem for parameters estimation of intake manifold subsystem

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Fig. 5

Structure of the optimization problem for parameters estimation of torque production subsystem

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Fig. 6

Volumetric efficiency ηv and data points. Root-mean-square evaluated by matlab curve fitting toolbox is 0.0081.

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Fig. 7

Throttle position (acquired from engine). Same is fed to the model for validation.

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Fig. 8

Intake manifold pressure (Pman) (continuous line is model output, dashed line is actual response). (a) Proposed FPEM and (b) conventional MVEM.

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Fig. 9

Crankshaft angular velocity (continuous line is model output, dashed line is actual response). (a) proposed FPEM and (b) conventional MVEM.

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Fig. 10

Engine crankshaft angular speed response when throttle is changed in stair-case pattern (validation error of ≤3.5%): (a) throttle position and (b) crankshaft angular speed

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Fig. 11

Engine crankshaft angular speed response when throttle is changed in large step sizes (validation error of ≤4.7%): (a) throttle position and (b) crankshaft angular speed

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Fig. 12

Effects of profile of crankshaft angular speed by variation in parameters of slider crank mechanism: (a) exact parameters of mechanism and (b) perturbed parameters of mechanism

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Fig. 13

Various parameters solved along-with engine speed: (a) translational tension in connecting rod, (b) force acting on piston, and (c) piston position

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Fig. 14

Piston reciprocating motion

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Fig. 15

Comparison of crankshaft angular speed in conventional MVEMs and proposed FPEM. Both models are run with same inputs and region of steady-state is magnified. (a) Oscillations in engine angular speed (magnified view of a portion of Fig. 9(a)). (b) Crankshaft angular speed profile constructed by conventional MVEM (magnified view of a portion of Fig. 9(b)).

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Fig. 17

Experimental arrangement

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