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research-article

Actuator Design and Flight Testing of an Active Microspoiler-Equipped Projectile

[+] Author and Article Information
Dooroo Kim

Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332
dooroo@gatech.edu

Laura Strickland

Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332
lstrickland12@gmail.com

Matthew Gross

Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332
msgross42@gmail.com

Jonathan Rogers

Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332
jrogers8@gmail.com

Mark Costello

Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332
mark.costello@aerospace.gatech.edu

Frank Fresconi

Guided Weapons, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 21005
frank.e.fresconi.civ@mail.mil

Ilmars Celmins

Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 21005
ilmars.celmins.civ@mail.mil

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036808 History: Received October 27, 2016; Revised April 28, 2017

Abstract

Actively controlled gun launched projectiles require a means of modifying the projectile flight trajectory. While numerous potential mechanisms exist, microspoiler devices have been shown to be a promising control actuator for fin-stabilized projectiles in supersonic flight. These devices induce a trim force and moment generated by the boundary-layer shock interaction between the projectile body, rear stabilizing fins, and microspoilers. Previous investigations of microspoiler mechanisms have established estimates of baseline control authority, but experimental results have been restricted to cases in which the mechanism was statically deployed. This paper details the design and flight testing of a projectile equipped with a set of active microspoilers. A mechanical actuator is proposed that exhibits unique advantages in terms of robustness, simplicity, gun-launch survivability, and bandwidth compared to other projectile actuator mechanisms considered to date. A set of integrated test projectiles is constructed using this actuator design, and flight experiments are performed in which the microspoilers are oscillated near the projectile roll frequency. Data obtained from these flight tests are used in parameter estimation studies to experimentally characterize the aerodynamic effects of actively oscillating microspoilers. These predictions compare favorably with estimates obtained from computational fluid dynamics. Overall, the results presented here demonstrate that actively controlled microspoilers can generate reasonably high levels of lateral acceleration suitable for trajectory modification in many smart-weapons applications.

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