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research-article

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fault Tolerant Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Richard Meyer

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008
richard.meyer@wmich.edu

Scott Johnson

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafaytte, Indiana 47907
johns924@purdue.edu

Ray A. DeCarlo

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafaytte, Indiana 47907
decarlo@ecn.purdue.edu

Steve Pekarek

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafaytte, Indiana 47907
spekarek@purdue.edu

Scott Sudhoff

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafaytte, Indiana 47907
sudhoff@purdue.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037270 History: Received September 26, 2016; Revised June 13, 2017

Abstract

This paper investigates the supervisory-level, fault tolerant control of a 2004 Prius powertrain. The fault considered is an inter-turn short circuit (ITSC) fault in the traction drive (a surface mount permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM) for which its rotor is part of the vehicle's driveline). ITSC faults are caused by electrical insulation failures in the stator windings where part of a phase winding remains functional while the remaining decoupled windings form a self contained loop. Because the permanent magnets on the rotor (driveline) shaft are able to induce very large eddy currents in this self contained loop if its rotational velocity is left unchecked, the maximum allowable driveline speed, and consequently vehicle speed, must be reduced to avoid exceeding the drive's operational thermal limits during a fault. A method for detecting these ITSC faults and the induced eddy current in a SPMSM using a moving horizon observer (MHO) is reviewed. These parameters then determine which previously computed, fault level dependent SPMSM input-output power efficiency map and maximum safe operating speed is utilized by the supervisory-level controller. The fault tolerant control is demonstrated by simulating a Prius over a 40~s drive velocity profile with fault levels of 0.5\%, 1\%, 2\%, and 5\% detected at the midpoint of the profile. For comparison, the Prius is also simulated without a traction motor fault. Results show that the control reduces vehicle velocity upon detection of a fault to an appropriate safe value.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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