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Research Papers

Design, Development, and Evaluation of a Control Framework for an Atkinson Cycle Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Murtaza

Center for Automotive Research,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43212
e-mail: gmurtazza@gmail.com

A. I. Bhatti

Department of Electrical Engineering,
Capital University of Science and Technology,
Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
e-mail: aib@cust.edu.com

Q. Ahmed

Center for Automotive Research,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43212
e-mail: ahmed.358@osu.edu

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT, AND CONTROL. Manuscript received December 20, 2016; final manuscript received October 21, 2017; published online December 19, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Beshah Ayalew.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 140(5), 051005 (Dec 19, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: DS-16-1604; doi: 10.1115/1.4038299 History: Received December 20, 2016; Revised October 21, 2017

The efficiency of the spark ignition (SI) engine degrades while working at part loads. It can be optimally dealt with a slightly different thermodynamic cycle termed as an Atkinson cycle. It can be implemented in the conventional SI engines by incorporating advanced mechanisms as variable valve timing (VVT) and variable compression ratio (VCR). In this research, a control framework for the Atkinson cycle engine with flexible intake valve load control strategy is designed and developed. The control framework based on the extended mean value engine model (EMVEM) of the Atkinson cycle engine is evaluated in the view of fuel economy at the medium and higher load operating conditions for the standard new European driving cycle (NEDC), federal urban driving schedule (FUDS), and federal highway driving schedule (FHDS) cycles. In this context, the authors have already proposed a control-oriented EMVEM model of the Atkinson cycle engine with variable intake valve actuation. To demonstrate the potential benefits of the VCR Atkinson cycle VVT engine, for the various driving cycles, in the presence of auxiliary loads and uncertain road loads, its EMVEM model is simulated by using a controller having similar specifications as that of the conventional gasoline engine. The simulation results point toward the significant reduction in engine part load losses and improvement in the thermal efficiency. Consequently, considerable enhancement in the fuel economy of the VCR Atkinson cycle VVT engine is achieved over conventional Otto cycle engine during the NEDC, FUDS, and FHDS cycles.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Theoretical pressure volume representation of an ideal Atkinson cycle engine [25,30]

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Fig. 2

Schematic representation of closed-loop Atkinson cycle VVT engine system

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Fig. 3

Demonstration of the functionality of the developed control framework using LIVC load handing strategy

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Fig. 4

Vehicle and, accordingly, the engine speed profile for the NEDC driving cycle

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Fig. 5

Speed tracking profile and, accordingly, the control effort using the PID controller at 12 N·m load conditions

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Fig. 6

Speed tracking error profiles for NEDC, FUDS, and FHDS with PID controller at 12 N·m load conditions

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Fig. 7

Pumping losses and thermal efficiency comparison of the Atkinson cycle engine and conventional Otto cycle engine during the NEDC driving cycle at 12 N·m operating conditions

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Fig. 11

Fuel consumption evaluation at the various engine's operating conditions during the FHDS driving cycle

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Fig. 10

Fuel consumption evaluation at the various engine's operating conditions during the FUDS driving cycle

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Fig. 9

Fuel consumption evaluation at the various engine's operating conditions during the NEDC driving cycle

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Fig. 8

Fuel mass flow rate comparison of the Atkinson cycle engine and conventional Otto cycle engine during the NEDC, FUDS, and FHDS driving cycles at 12 N·m load accordingly

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