0
research-article

Nonlinear models for magnet placement in individually-actuated magnetic cilia devices

[+] Author and Article Information
Nathan Banka

PhD Candidate, Student Member of ASME, Ultra Precision Control Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
nbanka@uw.edu

Santosh Devasia

Professor, Member of ASME, Ultra Precision Control Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
devasia@uw.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038534 History: Received May 01, 2017; Revised September 20, 2017

Abstract

This paper presents a model for predicting the optimal magnet placement in magnetic cilia devices that achieve individual control via localization of the driving magnetic field. In this configuration, each cilium is controlled by a magnetic field source which is limited in spatial extent, and the cilia are spaced sufficiently-far apart that the control remains uncoupled. An implementation is presented using an electromagnetic field source to attain large-deformation actuation (transverse deflections of 47% of the length). The large deformations are achieved by exploiting the nonlinear response of a flexible cantilever in a non-uniform magnetic field. However, the same non-linearities also pose a modeling challenge: the overall performance is sensitive to the location of the electromagnet and the location that produces the largest deflections is non-linearly dependent on the strength of the magnetic field. The nonlinear displacement of the cilium is predicted using a finite element model of the coupled magnetic-structural equations for static inputs at varying field strengths and magnet positions. The deflection at the model-predicted optimal placement is within 5% of the experiment-predicted optimal placement. Moreover, actuator placement using a model that does not include the nonlinearities is estimated to result in performance loss of about 50% peak deflection. This result emphasizes the importance of capturing nonlinearities in system design.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In