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Research Papers

A Random Walk Model Approach for the Wheel-Rail Contact Force Estimation

[+] Author and Article Information
Vincenzo Niola, Salvatore Strano

Department of Industrial Engineering,
University of Naples Federico II,
Naples 80125, Italy

Mario Terzo

Department of Industrial Engineering,
University of Naples Federico II,
Naples 80125, Italy
e-mail: mario.terzo@unina.it

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT,AND CONTROL. Manuscript received October 23, 2017; final manuscript received February 9, 2018; published online March 27, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Shankar Coimbatore Subramanian.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 140(7), 071016 (Mar 27, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: DS-17-1537; doi: 10.1115/1.4039469 History: Received October 23, 2017; Revised February 09, 2018

The wheel-rail contact strongly influences the dynamics of the railway vehicles. This interaction is affected by several conditioning factors such as vehicle speed, wear, and adhesion level, and, moreover, it is nonlinear. As a consequence, the modeling and the observation of this kind of phenomenon are complex tasks but, at the same time, they constitute a fundamental step for the estimation of the adhesion level or for the vehicle condition monitoring. This paper presents a novel technique for the real time estimation of the wheel-rail contact forces that allows an a priori no knowledge of this kind of mechanism because a random walk model (RWM) approach is adopted and integrated in a complete model based estimator for railway vehicle.

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Figures

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Fig. 2

Creep curves for different adhesion levels (normal load of 5000 kg)

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Fig. 8

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the trailing wheelset for low adhesion test

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Fig. 9

Moment on the leading wheelset for low adhesion test

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Fig. 10

Moment on the trailing wheelset for low adhesion test

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Fig. 11

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the leading wheelset for high to low adhesion test

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Fig. 12

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the trailing wheelset for high to low adhesion test

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Fig. 13

Moment on the leading wheelset for high to low adhesion test

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Fig. 14

Moment on the trailing wheelset for high to low adhesion test

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Fig. 6

Moment on the trailing wheelset for high adhesion test

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Fig. 7

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the leading wheelset for low adhesion test

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Fig. 3

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the leading wheelset for high adhesion test

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Fig. 4

Lateral wheel-rail contact force of the trailing wheelset for high adhesion test

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Fig. 5

Moment on the leading wheelset for high adhesion test

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