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Research Papers

In-Wheel-Motor-Driven Electric Vehicles Motion Control Methods Considering Motor Thermal Protection

[+] Author and Article Information
Yimin Chen

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: yiminchen@utexas.edu

Junmin Wang

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: JWang@austin.utexas.edu

1Present address: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712.

Contributed by the Dynamic Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS, MEASUREMENT,AND CONTROL. Manuscript received March 31, 2018; final manuscript received August 28, 2018; published online October 1, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Mahdi Shahbakhti.

J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 141(1), 011015 (Oct 01, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: DS-18-1153; doi: 10.1115/1.4041359 History: Received March 31, 2018; Revised August 28, 2018

Thermal protection strategies are employed to protect in-wheel-motors (IWM). Vehicle motions and stability can be affected by such motor thermal protections because they typically reduce the motor output torque to lower motor temperature and protect motor from thermal damage. This paper proposes a fault-tolerant control (FTC) method and a fault-prevention control (FPC) method for vehicle motion control considering motor thermal protection. The FTC method aims to stabilize vehicle motion when motor thermal protection is triggered. A control allocation (CA) algorithm using motor temperature measurement is developed for the FTC method. The output torque constraints can be actively adjusted with motor temperature to include thermal protection strategy in the controller design. When future vehicle trajectories are available, a model predictive control (MPC) FPC algorithm is created to regulate the control efforts in advance to avoid overheating the IWMs that triggers the thermal protection strategy. The proposed methods are validated in CarSim® simulations and the results show that both the FTC and FPC methods can reduce the vehicle yaw rate tracking errors when IWMs are subject to thermal protection strategy.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Vehicle planar motion diagram

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Fig. 2

Motor thermal protection strategy

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Fig. 3

Control structure of FTC

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Fig. 4

Control structure of FPC

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Fig. 5

Model predictive control method in FPC

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Fig. 6

Longitudinal velocity of FTC and CA without motor temperature measurement in straight-line acceleration

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Fig. 7

Yaw rate of FTC and CA without motor temperature measurement in straight-line acceleration

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Fig. 8

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying FTC in straight-line acceleration

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Fig. 9

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying CA without temperature measurement

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Fig. 10

Longitudinal velocity of FPC and MPC without thermal model in straight-line acceleration

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Fig. 11

Yaw rate of FPC and MPC without thermal model in straight-line acceleration

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Fig. 12

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying FPC

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Fig. 13

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying MPC without motor thermal model

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Fig. 14

Longitudinal velocity of FTC and CA without temperature in single lane-change

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Fig. 15

Yaw rate of FTC and CA without temperature in single lane-change

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Fig. 16

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying FTC

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Fig. 17

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying CA without motor temperature measurement

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Fig. 18

Longitudinal velocity of FPC and MPC without thermal model in single lane-change

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Fig. 19

Yaw rate of FPC and MPC without thermal model in single lane-change

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Fig. 20

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying FPC

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Fig. 21

Temperature and normalized torque of IWMs when applying MPC without motor thermal model

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