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research-article

Flatness-based control of a two-degree-of-freedom platform with pneumatic artificial muscles

[+] Author and Article Information
David Bou Saba

Laboratoire Ampère CNRS, INSA Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, France
david.bou-saba@insa-lyon.fr

Paolo Massioni

Laboratoire Ampère CNRS, INSA Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, France
paolo.massioni@insa-lyon.fr

eric bideaux

Laboratoire Ampère CNRS, INSA Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, France
eric.bideaux@insa-lyon.fr

Xavier BRUN

Laboratoire Ampère CNRS, INSA Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, France
xavier.brun@insa-lyon.fr

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041445 History: Received January 15, 2018; Revised September 06, 2018

Abstract

Pneumatic artificial muscles are an interesting type of actuators as they provide high power-to-weight and powerto-volume ratio. However, their efficient use requires very accurate control methods taking into account their complex and nonlinear dynamics. This paper considers a two-degree-of-freedom platform whose attitude is determined by three pneumatic muscles controlled by servovalves. An overactuation is present as three muscles are controlled for only two degrees of freedom. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, whereas most of the literature appraches the control of systems of similar nature with sliding mode control, we show that the platform can be controled with the flatness-based approach. This method is a nonlinear open-loop controller. In addition, this approach is model-based, and it can be applied thanks to the accurate models of the muscles, the platform and the servovalves, experimentally developed. In addition to the flatness-based controller, which is mainly a feedforward control, a proportional-integral controller is added in order to overcome the modeling errors and to improve the control robustness. Second, we solve the overactuation of the platform, by an adequate choice for the range of the efforts applied by the muscles. In this paper, we recall the basics of this control technique and then show how it is applied to the proposed experimental platform. At the end of the paper, the proposed approach is compared to the most commonly used control method, and its effectiveness is shown by means of experimental results.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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