0
research-article

Front/Rear axle Torque Vectoring Control for Electric Vehicles

[+] Author and Article Information
David Ruiz Diez

Advanced Vehicle Engineering Centre, Cranfield University, United Kingdom
drd1807@gmail.com

Efstathios Velenis

Advanced Vehicle Engineering Centre, Cranfield University, United Kingdom
e.velenis@cranfield.ac.uk

Davide Tavernini

Centre for Automotive Engineering, University of Surrey, United Kingdom
d.tavernini@surrey.ac.uk

Edward N. Smith

Advanced Vehicle Engineering Centre, Cranfield University, United Kingdom
e.smith@cranfield.ac.uk

Efstathios Siampis

Advanced Vehicle Engineering Centre, Cranfield University, United Kingdom
stathis@delta-motorsport.com

Amir Soltani

Advanced Vehicle Engineering Centre, Cranfield University, United Kingdom
m.m.soltani@cranfield.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042062 History: Received June 14, 2017; Revised November 18, 2018

Abstract

Vehicles equipped with multiple electric machines allow variable distribution of propulsive and regenerative braking torques between axles or even individual wheels of the car. Left/right torque vectoring (i.e. torque shift between wheels of the same axle) has been treated extensively in the literature yet very few studies approach the problem that considers torque shift between the front and rear axles, namely front/rear torque vectoring, a drivetrain topology more suitable for mass production since it reduces complexity and cost. In this paper we propose a control strategy that can enhance vehicle agility and "fun-to-drive" for such a topology or, if necessary, mitigate oversteer. The whole strategy is formulated in terms of physical quantities that are directly connected to the vehicle dynamic behaviour like torques and forces, instead of non-physical control signals. Hence, it is possible to easily incorporate the limitations of the electric machines and tyres into the computation of the control action. Furthermore, this approach allows us to perform an offline study to assess the effectiveness of the proposed strategy considering physical limitations before any tests or simulations. The development of the complete strategy is presented together with the aforementioned effectiveness study and the results from Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) simulations, using a high fidelity vehicle model and covering various use cases.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In